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I'm creating a subroutine in my perl script and can evaluate it nicely and it works. I would also like to print the content of the subroutine for debugging purposes. However, the subroutine, which is constructed in code, is really huge and is hard to read and understand it by simply printing it. I would like to find a way to be able to print it in a semi-indented way.

Here is piece of code generation:

$code .= "if (\$ct=~/^\\s*\$/x  || \$Im < \$Ix) {push(\@min, $b); push(\@max, $b);} if (\$Im > \$Ix) {push(\@min, $a); push(\@max, $a);}"

And I would like to print it something like this:

if (\$ct=~/^\\s*\$/x  || \$Im < \$Ix) 
    {push(\@min, $b); push(\@max, $b);}
if (\$Im > \$Ix)
    {push(\@min, $a); push(\@max, $a);}

I know that the straight way to do this is to write another script to parse it and put some \n and \t into the appropriate places in code and then print it. I'm wondering if is there any smarter way to that? Like putting \n somewhere in code without subverting evaling it. (i.e. something visible to print but invisible to eval).

NOTE: I have a lot of regex in my subroutine and I want to avoid running them every time. That's why I need to have the code stored in string and then eval it to increase my script performance.

PS This is obviously because of my laziness!

share|improve this question
2  
There is just about no good reason to build up a bunch of code in a string and then eval it... Just run the code rather than building the string. This seems like an X-Y problem to me. –  AKHolland Aug 14 at 21:29
2  
want nice-printed perl code what is stored as an string - use Perl::Tidy. –  jm666 Aug 14 at 21:34
3  
@AKHolland This answer shows a real-world case where a generated subroutine was necessary to avoid a major performance hit. Also, seconding what jm666 said; the easiest thing to do would be to print it out and pipe it to perltidy. Trying to prettify generated Perl code just makes the code doing the generation uglier. –  Slade Aug 14 at 21:37
1  
@Slade The key words in AKHolland's statement are just about no good reason; that's not the same as never. The OP of this question, however, has provided no evidence that eval is necessary for what they're trying to do. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Aug 14 at 21:41
1  
Here I asked another question which hopefully explains the necessity of storing subs in strings and evaling them. –  remmargorp Aug 14 at 23:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ignoring the reasons why you may have code in a string...

Perl::Tidy is the tool that you need to reformat your code.

Normally, one uses this tool via the command line on source files. However, I've hacked together a little script that will output your code string to a temporary file so that it can be reformatted. Note, this currently assumes that your code is well-formed and that there aren't any obvious syntax errors in it as formatting broken code is outside the purview of this tool.

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my $code = <<'END_CODE';
# It hurts to write ugly code, but I'll see what I can do
sub { my @vars = @_;
 my $count = scalar(@vars); print "Hello World.  Vars = $count"; return; }
END_CODE

print pretty_code($code);

sub pretty_code {
    my $code = shift;

    require File::Temp;
    require Perl::Tidy;

    my ($fh, $filename) = File::Temp::tempfile();
    print $fh $code;
    close $fh;

    Perl::Tidy::perltidy(
        source => $filename,
    );

    my $output = do {
        open my $fh, '<', "$filename.tdy";
        local $/;
        <$fh>
    };

    unlink $_ for ($filename, "$filename.tdy");

    return $output;
}

Outputs:

# It hurts to write ugly code, but I'll see what I can do
sub {
    my @vars  = @_;
    my $count = scalar(@vars);
    print "Hello World.  Vars = $count";
    return;
  }

Update

There is no need to use a temporary file, particularly as Perl::Tidy accumulates the tidied code in memory before dumping it to disk. If you prefer, this program does the same thing without writing the result to disk.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Perl::Tidy 'perltidy';

my $code = <<'END_CODE';
# It hurts to write ugly code, but I'll see what I can do
sub { my @vars = @_; my $count = scalar(@vars); print "Hello World.  Vars = $count"; return; }
END_CODE

print pretty_code($code);

sub pretty_code {
   my ($code) = @_;
   my $pretty;

   perltidy(
      source      => \$code,
      destination => \$pretty,
   );

   $pretty;
}

output

# It hurts to write ugly code, but I'll see what I can do
sub {
  my @vars  = @_;
  my $count = scalar(@vars);
  print "Hello World.  Vars = $count";
  return;
    }

I'm not clear at present why the closing brace is indented further, but I am certain that the result is better than the original.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Miller. Here I asked another question which hopefully explains the necessity of storing subs in strings and evaling them. –  remmargorp Aug 14 at 23:42
    
@Borodin I spent literally 20 minutes trying to get string references to work, but I kept on getting errors. It works now though, so thanks for confirming that either I'm crazy or my dev environment was for a little bit. –  Miller Aug 14 at 23:48
    
@remmargorp: (Please note that I am not the author of the answer above, although the Update is mine.) I have read the question that you linked and can still see no reason to choose your design. The code that you show in the earlier question doesn't compile so it is really hard to guess what you are doing. –  Borodin Aug 14 at 23:49
    
@Miller: It happens! I hope you don't mind the edit. –  Borodin Aug 14 at 23:50

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