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I'm trying to do some simple semantic analysis and having a hard time setting up my pattern matching correctly. This is a watered down example of my actual code, but it still captures the idea.

type expr = LiteralInt of int 
      | LiteralString of string
      | Binop of expr * op * expr 
   and op = Add | Mult 

let rec expr_check = function 
    | Binop(LiteralInt(e1), _, LiteralString(e2)) -> false 
    | Binop(LiteralString(e1), _, LiteralInt(e2)) -> false
    | Binop(LiteralInt(e1), _, LiteralInt(e)) -> true
    | Binop(l, _, LiteralInt(a)) -> expr_check l 
    | Binop(l, _, LiteralString(a)) -> expr_check l
    | Binop(LiteralInt(e1), _, l) -> expr_check l
    | LiteralInt(a) -> true
    | LiteralString(a) -> true 

(* Should be false *)
let first_check = expr_check (Binop(LiteralInt(1), Add, LiteralString("hi")));;

(* Should be false for: 4 + 5 + "hello" *)
let second_check = expr_check (Binop(Binop(LiteralInt(4), Add, LiteralInt(5)), Add, LiteralString("hello")))

I also tried this one, but it doesn't work either.

let rec expr_check = function 
    | Binop(LiteralInt(e1), _, LiteralString(e2)) -> false 
    | Binop(LiteralString(e1), _, LiteralInt(e2)) -> false
    | Binop(LiteralInt(e1), _, LiteralInt(e)) -> true
    | Binop(l, _, b) -> expr_check l && expr_check b
    | LiteralInt(a) -> true
    | LiteralString(a) -> true 
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Can you clarify what is your problem and what are you trying to do. It is not obvious to me –  ivg Aug 15 '14 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

It seems to me you need to propagate information about the types (in your language) of your subtrees. You can't just compare against literals, as you seem to be doing. Sometimes neither subtree is a literal.

You might be able to use fancy OCaml types to pull the types of your language up into the OCaml type system. But the straightforward method is to carry the type as a value.

type mytype = Mystring | Myinteger

Update

Here's what I'm saying. Whether I'm correct or not is another matter :-)

Let's say your input looks like this (in usual expression form):

("abc" + "def") + (3 + 5)

None of your patterns will notice that this is wrong, as far as I can tell. The correctness at an internal node is not just based on the correctness of the subnodes. It depends on types of the subnodes.

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I don't understand what you're saying. I can match whenever I have a Binop(1, Add, "123") and that's wrong...so why can't I just recursively call my function on operands? Couldn't a LiteralInt just be true? I mean a literal int is semantically valid... –  Edgar Aroutiounian Aug 15 '14 at 0:10
    
Because of the recursion, you need to bubble up the value at the root of the left and right subtrees to to verify their combination is valid. –  nlucaroni Aug 15 '14 at 13:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, so based off of Jeffrey's answer and some help on IRC, thanks Drup!, here is a subset of what I ended up doing.

exception SemanticError of string 
type typ = TInt | TString
(* Not an exhaustive match *)
let rec infer_typ = function
  | LiteralInt _ -> TInt
  | LiteralString _ -> TString
  | Binop (e1, op, e2) ->
      let (t1, t2, ret_typ) = infer_op_typ op in
      if check_expr e1 t1 && check_expr e2 t2
      then ret_typ (* Make this more informative *)
      else raise (SemanticError "Type problem with: ")
  | _ -> TInt 

and infer_op_typ = function
  | Add | Mult | Sub | Mult | Div | Equal | Neq | Less | Leq | Greater | Geq -> (TInt, TInt, TInt)

and check_expr e typ =
  let inf_typ = infer_typ e in
  typ = inf_typ

There is more code, but this is how much is at least relevant to answering this question.

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