Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a small bash script to call the build script for a website if the current directory is within the website somewhere, so the procedure is to cd into the parent directory while the build script isn't in the current directory, and while the current directory isn't /. Then check whether the build script is there and if so, run it. Here's what I've got:

while [ ! -f build-site.py ]
do
    [["`pwd`" == "/"]] && break
    cd ..
done

Why isn't this working? I've tried a few different variations; this one prints out an error message repeatedly until I Ctrl-C it:

/home/gus/bin/build-site: 7: /home/gus/bin/build-site: [[/: not found

share|improve this question
1  
Take advantage of available tooling. shellcheck points out the problem. –  that other guy Aug 15 '14 at 0:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simpler as well:

until [ -f build-site.py ] || [ "$(exec pwd)" = / ]
do
    cd ..
done
share|improve this answer

A space is missing after [[ (and before ]], too).

[[ "`pwd`" == "/" ]]
share|improve this answer

There were a couple of issues pointed out by shellcheck. Turns out the double square brackets aren't supported by the shell I was running (POSIX) and neither is double equals. This works:

while [ ! -f build-site.py ]
do
    [ $(pwd) = "/" ] && break
    cd ..
done
share|improve this answer
1  
Double equals is not supported by any [ command, although many do implement it as an undocumented feature... You probably want to add quotes around $(pwd), as well. What happens is pwd contains a space for example? –  Carpetsmoker Aug 15 '14 at 10:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.