Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i have been given class with int variables x and y in private, and an operator overload function,

class Bag{
private:
    int x;
    int y;
public:
    Bag();
    ~Bag();
    //.......
    //.....etc
};


Bag operator+ (Bag new) const{
    Bag result(*this);   //what does this mean?
    result.x += new.x;         
    result.y += new.y;
}

What is the effect of having "Bag result(*this);" there?.

share|improve this question
5  
Is the operator+ function missing a return statement? – Thomas Matthews Mar 28 '10 at 6:40
3  
This is not looks like valid C++ -- new is keyword – Artyom Mar 28 '10 at 8:08
    
If you wish to create operators, I suggest looking at Boost.Operators. They have grouped similar operators together (like += and +) and writing only one of the group grants you the others for free :) – Matthieu M. Mar 28 '10 at 14:10
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Bag result(*this) creates a copy of the object on which the operator function was called.

Example if there was:

sum = op1 + op2; 

then result will be a copy of op1.

Since the operator+ function is doing a sum of its operands and returning the sum, we need a way to access the operand op1 which is done through the this pointer.

Alternatively we could have done:

Bag result;
result.x = (*this).x + newobj.x; // note you are using new which is a keyword.
result.y = (*this).y + newobj.y; // can also do this->y instead
return result;
share|improve this answer

Your code would look like:

class Bag {
public:
  Bag();
  Bag(Bag const& other); // copy ctor, declared implicitly if you don't declare it
  ~Bag();

  Bag operator+(Bag const& other) const;

private:
  int x;
  int y;
};

Bag Bag::operator+(Bag const& other) const {
  Bag result (*this);
  result.x += other.x;         
  result.y += other.y;
  return result;
}

The implicit "current object" for member functions is pointed to by a special value named this. Then *this gets that object (by dereferencing this), and it is used to construct (via the copy constructor) another Bag named result.

I suspect this code is taken from a homework assignment, so you might not be able to use the one true addition operator pattern, but it is common and you should be aware of it:

struct Bag {
  //...
  Bag& operator+=(Bag const& other) {
    x += other.x;
    y += other.y;
    return *this; // return a reference to the "current object"
    // as almost all operator=, operator+=, etc. should do
  }
};

Bag operator+(Bag a, Bag const& b) {
  // notice a is passed by value, so it's a copy
  a += b;
  return a;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That is a dangerous way of writing op+() - the first parameter will be sliced, and if there was intended to be any polymorphic behaviour in the function based on it, there won't be. It's much better to make both parameters const references, and create the copy within the function. – anon Mar 28 '10 at 9:12
    
@Neil: Copying within the function also slices; it's much better to use this pattern until you need to change it. Also see cpp-next.com/archive/2009/08/want-speed-pass-by-value which promotes the same idiom for operator=. – Roger Pate Mar 28 '10 at 14:53

Firstly, tell the code writer not to use new as the variable name — it's a keyword. Also, remeber to return result;. And either pass by const-reference or directly modify the new bag.


Inside a struct/class, this is a pointer to itself. Therefore, *this is a reference to the whole Bag instance itself.

The statement Bag result(a_bag_reference) will call the copy constructor of Bag, which makes a copy of a_bag_reference into result.

Therefore,

Bag result(*this);

makes a copy of itself, then store into result. This makes the next 2 statements

result.x += new.x;
result.y += new.y;

do not affect the instance itself (i.e. this->x and this->y are kept constant).

share|improve this answer

The operator+ function returns a copy. The statement:

Bag result(*this);

Is making a copy of this object to return to the caller. According to the signature, it must return a value, so it is making a copy and then adding the new object.

share|improve this answer

Bag result(*this); is declaring a variable result and invoking its copy constructor.

You can imagine C++ automatically declares a default copy constructor for all classes. Its job is simply to initialize an object using another object:

Bag::Bag(Bag const& src) {
   x = src.x;
   y = src.y;
}

The expression *this may look a little unsettling, but is just the usual horror of C++ when you deal with & parameters.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.