Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using the following code to delete all files from a particular folder:

Sub DeleteFiles(Folder As String)
    If Directory.Exists(Folder) Then
        For Each _file As String In Directory.GetFiles(Folder)

            File.Delete(_file)

        Next
        For Each _folder As String In Directory.GetDirectories(Folder)

            DeleteFiles(_folder)
        Next

    End If

End Sub

Whenever I use the above code to delete all files from "C:\Temp" by calling it using DeleteFiles("C:\Temp"), It deletes all the files successfully, but whenever I try to use the same code for deleting files in "C:\Windows\TEMP\", it breaks the operation saying that the file is in use. I want that the code should not raise an exception and stop deleting the files right-away. If the file cannot be deleted, the code should move on to the next file and try deleting it. This way, it should be able to delete maximum possible files from that directory.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to handle exceptions raised by File.Delete() using a Try....Catch... statement. I'm not a VB coder (I'm surprised to find myself answering this question), but something like this should work:

Sub DeleteFiles(Folder As String)
    If Directory.Exists(Folder) Then
        For Each _file As String In Directory.GetFiles(Folder)
            Try 
                File.Delete(_file)
            Catch e As System.IO.IOException
                Console.WriteLine(e.Message)
            End Try
        Next
        For Each _folder As String In Directory.GetDirectories(Folder)

            DeleteFiles(_folder)
        Next

    End If

End Sub

This will catch an System.IO.IOException exception, log that it was received, and then ignore it. Note that this will catch a number of other File.Delete() related exceptions such as System.IO.DirectoryNotFoundException, System.IO.PathTooLongException, etc. If you want to catch these, you must add a Catch clause for each before the more general System.IO.IOException. The possible exceptions are listed here, along with an example of using File.Delete() - you just need to read the docs.

You might like to also look at Directory.Delete to recursively delete a directory, its files, and its subdirectories.

share|improve this answer

You can't stop an exception being thrown. What you need to do is catch the exception, process it as appropriate (which may mean just ignoring it) and move on. That means putting a Try...Catch block inside your first loop. That way, when File.Delete throws an exception, you can catch it, ignore it and the loop will continue.

Be sure to catch only the type of exception that you expect to be thrown though. Otherwise, something completely unexpected may be causing an issue and you're just ignoring it, which is bad. Only ignore exceptions that you reasonably expect and know can be safely ignored.

share|improve this answer
Dim temp As String = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("TEMP")
    Dim k As String() = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(temp)
    Dim i As Integer
    For i = 0 To k.Length
        On Error Resume Next
        Kill(k(i))
        System.IO.File.Delete(k(i))
    Next
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.