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Suppose you have a Javascript object like {'cat':'meow','dog':'woof' ...} Is there a more concise way to pick a random property from the object than this long winded way I came up with:

function pickRandomProperty(obj) {
    var prop, len = 0, randomPos, pos = 0;
    for (prop in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            len += 1;
        }
    }
    randomPos = Math.floor(Math.random() * len);
    for (prop in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            if (pos === randomPos) {
                return prop;
            }
            pos += 1;
        }
    }       
}
share|improve this question
up vote 52 down vote accepted

Picking a random element from a stream

function pickRandomProperty(obj) {
    var result;
    var count = 0;
    for (var prop in obj)
        if (Math.random() < 1/++count)
           result = prop;
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
excellent!..... – user187291 Mar 28 '10 at 9:00
    
Does the ECMAScript standard say anything about the properties always being traversed in the same order? Objects in most implementations have stable ordering, but the behavior is undefined in the spec: stackoverflow.com/questions/280713/… – Brendan Berg Sep 20 '10 at 18:46
2  
This seems to have a skew towards the first element in the object. I haven't figured out why yet! – Cole Gleason Jan 11 '14 at 8:14
2  
This will never select the first property (Math.random is always < 1) and after that each number will have a 0.5 chance of being selected. So 0.5 for the second property, 0.25 for the 3rd, 0.125 for the 4th etc. – SystemicPlural Aug 29 '14 at 14:41
3  
Some corrections: This function can select the first property. On the first iteration, the prefix increment on count makes the right hand side of the equation evaluate to 1/1 == 1. Since Math.random is always in the range [0,1) (zero to one, excluding one), the expression evaluates to true and the first property is selected. As far as the distribution of the random selection goes, it is uniform. With one property there is a 100% chance it will be selected. With two there is a 50% chance either will be selected. With three a 33.3%. And so on. This solution has a minimal memory footprint. – Constablebrew Mar 13 '15 at 6:51

The chosen answer will work well. However, this answer will run faster:

var randomProperty = function (obj) {
    var keys = Object.keys(obj)
    return obj[keys[ keys.length * Math.random() << 0]];
};
share|improve this answer
4  
Please explain why you think the chosen answer doesn't work. – Frizi Nov 29 '13 at 21:01
2  
this is better as it doesn't use a loop – Dominic Tobias Mar 28 '14 at 11:02
2  
I did some testing, and it appears that the chosen answer works just fine and that the choice of property is unbiased (contrary to speculations among the responses); however, I tested on an object with 170,000 keys and the solution here was around twice as fast as the chosen solution. – Dragonfly May 4 '14 at 18:33
2  
Is << 0 (bitshift to the left by 0) a shorthand method of writing Math.round()? – SystemicPlural Aug 29 '14 at 14:55
2  
This jsperf jsperf.com/random-object-property-selection benchmarks this answer and the chosen answer. This answer performs better by 3x for smaller objects (100 properties). Larger objects (100k properties) the difference drops to 2x better. – Constablebrew Mar 13 '15 at 6:43

You can just build an array of key while walking through the object.

var keys = [];
for (var prop in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        keys.push(prop);
    }
}

then randomly pick an element from the keys.

return keys[ keys.length * Math.random() << 0 ];
share|improve this answer
4  
Object.keys is useful here var keys = Object.keys(obj) – whadar Jan 6 '13 at 15:11

If you are capable of using libraries, you may find that Lo-Dash JS library has lots of very useful methods for such cases. In this case, go ahead and check _.sample().

(Note Lo-Dash convention is naming the library object _. Don't forget to check installation in the same page to set it up for your project.)

_.sample([1, 2, 3, 4]);
// → 2

In your case, go ahead and use:

_.sample({
    cat: 'meow',
    dog: 'woof',
    mouse: 'squeak'
});
// → "woof"
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