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I got a user control that I want to style with a larger bunch of CSS. Because the control can be implemented several times into the website as well as the CSS can vary on dependent properties of the user control, I cannot use a global extern CSS. So I need a scoped CSS part that comes with the control itself. Unfortunately HTML5 scoped styles are not common yet, so this is out of question.

My idea: I want to use a style tag within my root asp:Panel of my user control to style specific parts of my control. With the generated client ID of the parent container I can define a strict scope of the CSS. I optain the generated ID with a server variable:

<asp:Panel ID="pRoot" runat="server">
    <style type="text/css">
        #<%= this.pRoot.ClientID %> .myClass { 
            background-color: magenta; 
            width: 100px; 
            height: 100px; 
        }
    </style>
    <asp:Panel ID="pTest" runat="server" CssClass="myClass" />
</asp:Panel>

Now this will not work as it assumes <%= this.pRoot.ClientID %> is CSS, too. I know a static parent ID or code behind mechanics can solve this specific case, anyways.

So I just wonder:

Is there a way to get a server sided variable into my style part of my markup without using code behind?

EDIT: It turned out, that the above example will work. Visual Studio just tells me the above example is not valid HTML. Annoying error, makes the same problems just as using server sided variables in JavaScript. Microsoft, something has to be done about that.

Any idea to get rid of this error?

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1 Answer 1

You can bind to page level methods and properties:

<%# propertyName %>

<%# MethodName() %>

both implemented in your page class.

The ID could come from server side anyway.

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