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I need to check whether the sum of any 2 elements of an array equals to the given number. This is what I came up with, but it doesn't seem to do the comparison

def sum_comparison(int_array, x)
  n = int_array.length
  (0..n).each do |i|
    (1..n).each do |j|
      if ((int_array[i].to_i + int_array[j].to_i) == x)
        return true
      else
        return false
      end
    end
  end
end
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What is your question? –  sawa Aug 15 '14 at 11:17
    
The code I posted doesn't seem to work correctly, I need someone to hint where is the mistake –  codingal Aug 15 '14 at 11:19
    
How is sum_comparison used? What is int_array_length? –  sawa Aug 15 '14 at 11:20
    
I don't understand problem description. You want to see if sum of two-element array is equal to something or that any two elements sum up to, or what etc? –  Michal Szyndel Aug 15 '14 at 11:35
    
The array may have any number of elements, not obligatory 2. I need to check if sum of any 2 elements of the array equals to some number(I pass the number as the second parameter to the method and the number maybe any as well. Does it make it clear? –  codingal Aug 15 '14 at 11:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your solution seems overly complicated and strongly influenced by the programming style of low-level procedural languages like C. One apparent problem is that you write

n = int_array.length
(0..n).each do |i|
  # use int_array[i].to_i inside the loop
end

Now inside the each loop, you will get the numbers i = 0, 1, 2, ..., n, for example for int_array = [3,4,5] you get i = 0, 1, 2, 3. Notice that there are four elements, because you started counting at zero (this is called an off by one error). This will eventually lead to an array access at n, which is one beyond the end of the array. This will again result in a nil coming back, which is probably why you use to_i to convert that back to an integer, because otherwise you would get a TypeError: nil can't be coerced into Fixnum whend doing the addition. What you probably wanted instead was simply:

int_array.each do |i|
  # use i inside the loop
end

For the example array [3,4,5] this would actually result in i = 3, 4, 5. To get the combinations of an array in a more Ruby way, you can for example use Array#combination. Likewise, you can use Array#any? to detect if any of the combinations satisfy the specified condition:

def sum_comparison(array, x)
  array.combination(2).any? do |a, b|
    a + b == x
  end
end
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1  
>any 2 elements –  zishe Aug 15 '14 at 11:22
    
@zishe thanks for your comment, fixed it. –  Patrick Oscity Aug 15 '14 at 11:25
2  
Is there any reason to use permutation rather than combination? The latter is a subset of the former, and is enough to be considered. –  sawa Aug 15 '14 at 11:34
1  
@sawa you are correct, combination is better since it will yield less results and thus terminate faster when the condition is not met. The order is irrelevant because integer addition is commutative. –  Patrick Oscity Aug 15 '14 at 11:36
    
@p11y, Thanks it helped –  codingal Aug 15 '14 at 11:54

When your function compare first element, it's immediately returns false. You need to return only true when iterating and return false at the end if nothing were found, to avoid this issue:

def sum_comparison(int_array, x)
  n = int_array.size
  (0...n).each do |i|
    (1...n).each do |j|
      if (int_array[i].to_i + int_array[j].to_i) == x
        return true
      end
    end
  end
  false
end

To simplify this you can use permutation or combination and any? methods as @p11y suggests. To get founded elements you could use find or detect.

def sum_comparison(a, x)
  a.combination(2).any? { |i, j| i + j == x }
end

a.combination(2).detect { |i, j| i + j == x }
# sum_comparison([1,2,3, 4], 6) => [2, 4]
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Small comment on the first (long) solution: You will always go through all elements, you could return true when a match was found and just write false at the end of the method. This allows you to terminate early. Your suggestion of using detect is very useful. –  Patrick Oscity Aug 15 '14 at 12:04
    
Yes, thanks, it should be mentioned. –  zishe Aug 15 '14 at 13:45

Using an enumerator:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

def sum_comparison(int_array, x)
  enum = int_array.to_enum
  loop do
    n = enum.next
    enum.peek_values.each do |m|
      return true if (n + m) == x
    end
  end
  false
end

puts sum_comparison([1, 2, 3, 4], 5)

Output:

true
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Why should this be more efficient? –  Patrick Oscity Aug 15 '14 at 11:33
    
@p11y Just my thoughts actually sorry. At least I find it easier to portray. –  konsolebox Aug 15 '14 at 11:42
    
My point is that while your code is correct, you are only using a lower level API to accomplish the same thing. Your code will not terminate earlier or something. However I have a problem with it because it introduces more syntactic noise. –  Patrick Oscity Aug 15 '14 at 11:46
    
@p11y I see. That's basically a matter of taste. Actually, if Enumerator#peek_values is programmatically optimized that element pointers are not reproduced, the form should be faster than anything that reproduces sets of elements. Only thing is that I don't have the time to look at Ruby's code yet. –  konsolebox Aug 15 '14 at 11:49
    
If you've started as a coder in C who cared much about optimization you'd comprehend what I mean. Those who started with interpreted languages tend to only care about readability. –  konsolebox Aug 15 '14 at 11:52

Problem

Your method is equivalent to:

def sum_comparison(int_array, x)
  return int_array[0].to_i + int_array[1].to_i == x
end

Therefore,

int_array = [1,2,4,16,32,7,5,7,8,22,28]
sum_comparison(int_array, 3) #=> true, just lucky!
sum_comparison(int_array, 6) #=> false, wrong!

Alternative

Here is a relatively efficient implemention, certainly far more efficient than using Enumerable#combination.

Code

def sum_comparison(int_array, x)
  sorted = int_array.sort
  smallest = sorted.first
  sorted_stub = sorted.take_while { |e| e+smallest <= x }
  p "sorted_stub = #{sorted_stub}"
  return false if sorted_stub.size < 2
  loop do
    return false if sorted_stub.size < 2
    v = sorted_stub.shift
    found = sorted_stub.find { |e| v+e >= x }
    return true if found && v+found == x
  end
  false
end

Examples

sum_comparison([7,16,4,12,-2,5,8], 3)
  # "sorted_stub = [-2, 4, 5]"
  #=> true
sum_comparison([7,16,4,12,-2,5,8], 7)
  # "sorted_stub = [-2, 4, 5, 7, 8]"
  #=> false
sum_comparison([7,16,4,22,18,12,2,41,5,8,17,31], 9)
  # "sorted_stub = [2, 4, 5, 7]"
  #=> true

Notes

  • The line p "sorted_stub = #{sorted_stub}" is included merely to display the array sorted_stub in the examples.

  • If e+smallest > x for any elements f and g in sorted for which g >= e and f < g, f+g >= e+smallest > x. Ergo, sorted_stub.last is the largest value in sorted that need be considered.

  • For a given value v, the line found = sorted_stub.find { |e| v+e >= x } stops the search for a second value e for which v+e = x as soon as it finds e such that v+e >= x. The next line then determines if a match has been found.

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