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(Using Win32:OLE w/ Perl)

Is there a way to specify which workbook an Excel macro is run from if multiple workbooks are already open?

I am using the following code, but it sometimes fails if more than one Excel workbook is open. I know there is an obvious solution to just close the other workbooks, but my work often involves using another Excel workbook (which is a hassle to keep closing and reopening). So I am hoping there is a way to specify which workbook to run the macro from (perhaps similar to how one specifies an additional parameter such as the title for Win32::GUI).

Here is an example of what currently just works with one workbook open:

use Win32::OLE;
my $excel = Win32::OLE->GetActiveObject('Excel.Application');
$excel->Run("macroName"); 

The macro I am running exports all the sheets of the current workbook, so it is important that it is run from the correct workbook. I checked out this question (How do I use Perl to run a macro in an **already open** Excel workbook) but it doesn't seem to address how to select which macro the workbook is run from.

I was also reading through this article (http://docs.activestate.com/activeperl/5.6/faq/Windows/ActivePerl-Winfaq12.html), but it didn't seem to show a way how to run a macro from a specific workbook. Thinking a bit more, I could see not being able to specify which workbook to run from being an issue if two workbooks have the same macro name, but for some reason, these do different things.

Any suggestions?

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I dont know much about PERL but maybe $Excel->Workbooks->open('c:\somefile.xls'); – mrbungle Aug 15 '14 at 15:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to select the worksheet you want within the workbook. e.g. open a file, select the second workbook (by name) and activate it:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Win32::OLE;
use Win32::OLE::Const 'Microsoft Excel';

my $excelfile = 'd:\\Book1.xls';

my $Excel = Win32::OLE->GetActiveObject('Excel.Application') 
    || Win32::OLE->new('Excel.Application');
$Excel->{'Visible'} = 1;
my $Book = $Excel->Workbooks->Open("$excelfile") or die "$!";

my $Sheet = $Book->Worksheets("Sheet2");
$Sheet->Activate();   

This is a great reference for working with Win32::OLEperl Win32::OLE cheat sheet

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the link, that was helpful. Your code involves opening files though, which I don't need to do: I just want to access a macro from a specific workbook among all that are already open – resfasa Aug 15 '14 at 15:52
    
@resfasa my code is a stand alone example, so that everyone can get the benifit of the answer, regardless of their differing methods of accessing Excel. The part you need to copy is where I select a specific workbook and activate it. Then call your macro. – Dr.Avalanche Aug 15 '14 at 15:57
    
This is true - your code is a good stand alone example, it just wasn't what I needed exactly (an option to do this w/o file opening), see the first line of my question (workbooks already open). Why the downvotes? – resfasa Aug 15 '14 at 19:46

Based on DR.Avalanche's link and answer (which isn't the exact answer to my question, but led me to what I needed) here is the method I found that works:

use Win32::OLE;
my $excel = Win32::OLE->GetActiveObject('Excel.Application');

#___ ACTIVATE EXISTING WORKBOOK
$excel -> Windows("myBook") -> Activate;
$workbook = $excel    -> Activewindow;
$excel->Run("macroName"); 

So basically the workbook needs to be set as the Activewindow, and then excel will know which workbook to run the macro from.

Thanks for the help.

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