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I have a static array in my User model declared like this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
...
states = ['NYC', 'CAL', ...]
...
end

I know I should create a model for the states but I figured I just need the list for registration purposes. When I try to use it in a view like this:

= f.select(:state, options_for_select(states))

I get a Undefinded Method error. I tried using instance variables through the controller and that didnt work either. Whats the correct way of doing this?

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use STATES = ['NYC', 'CAL', ...] in corresponding controller, instead of model –  RAJ ... Aug 15 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

States collection is not specific to a user, so I wouldn't have it under the User model. As shown in this answer, I would add a us_states helper to your application, and use that in your views:

= f.select(:state, options_for_select(us_states))

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Thank you this seems more appropriate. –  josenova Aug 15 at 15:57
    
Yep -- a helper handles it better here –  John Paul Ashenfelter Aug 17 at 17:40

You should be able to access it as

User::STATES

that's assuming you upcase it from states to STATES since that's idiomatic :)

Another option is to create a class method that returns the array

def self.states
  ['NYC', 'CAL', etc]
end

Capitalizing the constant in the model and using the Model::CONSTANT syntax is probably the most common way to do this.

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That made the trick thank you. Is declaring User::STATES inside the view the Rails way of doing this tho? –  josenova Aug 15 at 15:41
    
The model is where you want to define it IF it belongs with the model. You can also do things like have application constants in a non-model lib/ or concerns/ directory. –  John Paul Ashenfelter Aug 17 at 17:40

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