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I'm trying emulate an <input type="text"> in SVG by listening keypresses and keydowns on the <body> of the page.

There seems to be an issue with accented letters on the Mac. You have to type Opt+e, a for getting an á, and the same for other vowels.

I'm listening on the body like this (JSFiddle):

var theElement = document;
theElement.onkeypress = function(e) {
    console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " " + e.keyCode);
}
theElement.onkeydown = function(e) {
    console.log("Down: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " " + e.keyCode);
}
theElement.onkeyup = function(e) {
    console.log("Up: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " " + e.keyCode);
}

On Windows, typing an é I get the following log:

Down: Þ 222 (index):27

Up: Þ 222 (index):30

Down: E 69 (index):27

Press: é 233 (index):24

Up: E 69 (index):30

And it works OK. But on a Mac I get:

Down: 18 (index):27

Down: E 69 (index):27

Up: E 69 (index):30

Up: 18 (index):30

Down: E 69 (index):27

Press: e 101 (index):24

Up: E 69

18 is the Option key pressed up or down, but it seems to forget the accent is trying to be typed, and I only get a press for the e character.

Even weirder, when I attach the same events to an <input type="text"> box, I get the é typed on the input (again, in the Mac), but the press event shows a standard e instead of an accented one (JSFiddle):

Down: 18 (index):27

Down: å 229 (index):27

Up: E 69 (index):30

Up: 18 (index):30

Down: å 229 (index):27

Up: E 69 (index):30

And it doesn't matter what accented letter I type (é, á, you name it), it displays the same 229 code.

The log is exactly the same as the <body> one in Windows - ie, it works OK and consistently in both fiddles on Windows.

I'm testing both in a recent Google Chrome (I can't swore it's the latest, but it's kind of up-to-date).

Halp?!

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1  
Entering accented characters is highly OS-specific (see stackoverflow.com/a/14546380/2564301). OSX temporarily saves the accent code and awaits the next key press. If it can find a matching accented character, it sends that to the application; if not, you get two characters, first the accent on its own, then the new character. –  Jongware Aug 16 '14 at 23:02

1 Answer 1

You could catch the option key

var theElement = document;
theElement.onkeypress = function(e) {
    if (theElement.accent === true)
        console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " (accented) " + e.keyCode);
    else 
        console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " " + e.keyCode);
}
theElement.onkeydown = function(e) {
    theElement.accent = true;
    if (theElement.accent === true)
        console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " (accented) " + e.keyCode);
    else 
        console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " " + e.keyCode);
}
theElement.onkeyup = function(e) {
    theElement.accent = false;
    if (theElement.accent === true)
        console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " (accented) " + e.keyCode);
    else 
        console.log("Press: " + String.fromCharCode(e.keyCode) + " " + e.keyCode);
}

I mean in acctual implementation you would probably want to create a function to get the accented character code from an array or something.

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