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I would like to be able to typedef functions in order to be able to use template metaprogramming as a function selector (like in the example below). I've also tried passing the function as a template argument. In both cases the error arises because the functions are not types. I know either of these methods would work if they were functors, but I'd like to be able to have a general solution.

Is there an actual way to "typedef functions", but under a different name, that I'm just not aware of?

EDIT:

My use case at this time is that I would like to be able to select between using boost::property_tree::xml_parser::read_xml and boost::property_tree::json_parser::read_json . But it is not limited to just this case, and using member functions, function pointers or std::function will require all of the exact function defintions to be found and copied to correctly create a selector.

A more general way to describe the use case would be like using typedef double my_float so that at a later time all of the code can be changed with a single edit. Or, more advanced, the typedef could be defined in a metaprogam selector.

void foo1() { /*do stuff*/ }
void foo2() { /*do other stuff*/ }

template <bool SELECT>
struct Selector {
    typedef foo1 foo;
};

template <>
struct Selector<false> {
    typedef foo2 foo;
};
share|improve this question
    
If I'm understanding what you want to do, just have a member function that calls it. –  chris Aug 15 '14 at 19:39
4  
You might want to look into std::function and std::bind, as I don't think you're actually looking for a typedef / type alias here. –  OMGtechy Aug 15 '14 at 19:40
1  
@chris That would require the member function have a matching type signature. For some of the heavily templated/overloaded function in boost/STL that would be very difficult to get right. –  John Smith Aug 15 '14 at 19:43
    
@JohnSmith, Ok I guess I missed the point then. –  chris Aug 15 '14 at 19:51
    
A typedef would require a function to be a type, which it isn't - just like 2 and "foo" are not types. –  molbdnilo Aug 15 '14 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yet another couple of solutions:

1) C++03 solution: constant static function pointer as a member of a class template

typedef void (*Foo)();

template <bool>
struct Selector
{
    static const Foo foo;
};

template <bool select>
const Foo Selector<select>::foo = foo1;

template <>
const Foo Selector<false>::foo = foo2;

// ...

Selector<true>::foo();
Selector<false>::foo();

Live example.

2) C++11 solution: constant static auto member of a class template

template <bool>
struct Selector
{
    static constexpr auto foo = foo1;
};

template <>
struct Selector<false>
{
    static constexpr auto foo = foo2;
};

// ...

Selector<true>::foo();
Selector<false>::foo();

Live example.

3) C++14 solution: auto variable template

template <bool>
constexpr auto foo = nullptr;

template <>
constexpr auto foo<true> = foo1;

template <>
constexpr auto foo<false> = foo2;

// ...

foo<true>();
foo<false>();

Live example.

share|improve this answer
    
The C++14 example words perfectly. Note that it also worked for me with Clang 3.4 -std=c++11. –  John Smith Aug 15 '14 at 20:22
1  
Works only because both foo1 and foo2 have the same signature. To use foo you have to know what parameters you have to pass –  Massimo Costa Aug 15 '14 at 20:25
    
@JohnSmith It doesn't work with -Wall -Wextra -pedantic-errors flags, of course. –  Constructor Aug 15 '14 at 20:26
1  
Yes, but John Smith said this is the problem! –  Massimo Costa Aug 15 '14 at 20:30
1  

I assume your goal is just to select the function based on some bool. You can easily do this with member functions:

template <bool select>
struct selector {
    void operator () () {foo1();}
};

template <>
struct selector <false> {
    void operator () () {foo2();}
};

You can of course use an int parameter and the same technique to switch between more than two functions. You can then pass this struct as argument to any function that expects a function of the same signature as foo1. (Live)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this would work. As I mentioned in the comments about, the problem is with some of the heavily overloaded Boost/STL functions –  John Smith Aug 15 '14 at 19:53

You can :

1) Use member functions

void foo1() { std::cout << "foo1\n"; }
void foo2() { std::cout << "foo2\n"; }

template <bool SELECT>
struct Selector {
    void foo() { foo1(); };
};

template <>
struct Selector<false> {
    void foo() { foo2(); };
};

int main() {

  Selector<true> s1t;
  Selector<false> s1f;

  s1t.foo();
  s1f.foo();
}

2) Use a generic function wrapper such as std::function :

void foo1() { std::cout << "foo1\n"; }
void foo2() { std::cout << "foo2\n"; }

template <bool SELECT>
struct Selector2 {
    std::function<void(void)> foo = foo1;
};

template <>
struct Selector2<false> {
    std::function<void(void)> foo = foo2;
};

int main() {

  Selector2<true> s2t;
  Selector2<false> s2f;

  s2t.foo();
  s2f.foo();

  return 0;
}

Live demo

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this would work. As I mentioned in the comments about, the problem is with some of the heavily overloaded Boost/STL functions. –  John Smith Aug 15 '14 at 19:52
    
What means "the problem is with some of the heavily overloaded Boost/STL functions" ?. IMHO the std::function solution is very elegant and flexible. You should anyway have a fixed (or minimal using default values) signature of a function to call it. –  Massimo Costa Aug 15 '14 at 19:55
    
boost.org/doc/libs/1_56_0/doc/html/property_tree/… read_xml is an example. It only has two overloads, but quite a few number of arguments. std::function or a member function would have to have the correct function signatures to correctly map these. –  John Smith Aug 15 '14 at 20:00
    
Please, add an example of what you need! To call a function you must know the signature to pass parameters. or you need a generic map (like Qt QVariantMap class) –  Massimo Costa Aug 15 '14 at 20:05
    
@JohnSmith I agree with MassimoCosta : you should respecify your question by editing it, probably with more code and use cases, to get a more accurate answer. –  quantdev Aug 15 '14 at 20:08

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