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One of my applications would greatly benefit from a variant of std::unique_ptr<T> which could be configured to not always assume ownership of the object being pointed to.

Consider the following class hierarchy:

class AbstractFoo { ... };

template<typename T> Foo : public AbstractFoo 
{
    Foo( const AbstractFoo& absFoo ) { ... } 
    ... 
};

and an API which standardizes upon every routine accepting an AbstractFoo and converting to particular instances of Foo<T> as necessary. In cases where the reference to an AbstractFoo is actually already an instance of the proper derived type, only a dynamic_cast is required and no data need be copied. However, when the abstract reference is of the improper type, non-trivial work needs to be performed to create a copy in the requested format.

My desired interface would look as follows:

template<typename T>
my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>> Convert( AbstractFoo& absFoo )
{
    if( Foo<T>* foo = dynamic_cast<Foo<T>*>(&absFoo) )
        return my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>>( foo, false );
    else
        return my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>>( new Foo<T>(absFoo) );
}

void Bar( AbstractFoo& absFoo )
{
    my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>> ptr = Convert<T>( absFoo );
    ...
}

where the class make_unique_ptr<T> has a constructor similar to std::unique_ptr<T>, but with an optional boolean argument which specifies whether or not the pointer should be owned by the smart pointer or not.

Is there a best practice solution for such a situation? I would prefer to avoid returning a raw pointer since it may lead to memory leaks if an exception is thrown before an object is manually deleted.

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3  
Would shared_ptr work? (you'd either need AbstractFoo to implement enable_shared_from_this or pass a shared_ptr to Convert instead of a reference). –  dlf Aug 15 '14 at 20:12
3  
Yes, that seems to be a case for shared_ptr, which does exactly what you said: doesn't always assume ownership, and behaves accordingly. Your boolean flag has an implicit equivalent in shared_ptr's reference counter. Other possibility is to always clone the object even if the type is right, but perhaps provide a method for cheap&fast cloning if possible. –  BartoszKP Aug 15 '14 at 20:15
    
@dlf According to the documentation, both of your suggested approaches require the object to be already managed by a shared_ptr. This is unfortunately extremely intrusive and I had hoped that the usage of smart pointers would be limited to within my implementations of the library. –  Jack Poulson Aug 15 '14 at 20:25
1  
@JackPoulson Yes, that is true. If that's a deal-breaker, you'll need something else (such as BartoszKP's suggestion of always creating a clone, but making cloning cheap). –  dlf Aug 15 '14 at 20:27
4  
what about using a smart pointer with an empty deleter? –  programmerjake Aug 15 '14 at 20:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could make use of shared_ptr in conjunction with a custom deleter:

template<typename T>
shared_ptr<Foo<T>> Convert( AbstractFoo& absFoo )
{
    if( Foo<T>* foo = dynamic_cast<Foo<T>*>(&absFoo) )
        return shared_ptr<Foo<T>>( foo, [](Foo<T>*){} ); // do-nothing deleter
    else
        return make_shared<Foo<T>>( absFoo ); // regular deleter
}

Update: programmerjake evidently wrote the same idea in a comment while I was typing this. If you want to write it as an answer, I'll delete mine.

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It will only leak if the code fails to delete the original AbstractFoo& that was passed to Convert, which would have been true before too. Otherwise, the reference count will go up and down as usual until it reaches 0, at which point...nothing will happen. :) –  dlf Aug 15 '14 at 20:38
    
@BartoszKP no, the returned object would have the same lifetime as the argument –  programmerjake Aug 15 '14 at 20:45

I think this design is broken brittle:

template<typename T>
my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>> Convert( AbstractFoo& absFoo )
{
    if( Foo<T>* foo = dynamic_cast<Foo<T>*>(absFoo) )
        return my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>>( foo, false );
    else
        return my_unique_ptr<Foo<T>>( new Foo<T>(absFoo) );
}

In the if path, you create an object that is tied to the lifetime of the absFoo argument.

In the else path you create an object that is not tied to the lifetime of any other object.

The caller cannot distinguish between the two cases - this seems rather brittle.


As for still using it (with shared_ptr like dlf suggests) ... Maybe Convert could be called smart_foo_cast or somesuch, then the lifetime thing would be imho better evident in its name.

Personally, I would also have it take an AbstractFoo* (that change would not affect the external API). Just make sure to never have it take a const AbstractFoo&, as you never know when a const& might be an implicit temporary.


Your problem would go away if you can either (optionally) "sink" the argument by using a unique_ptr as arg, or "share" the argument.

// Caller always yields ownership of absFoo:
template<typename T>
unique_ptr<Foo<T>> Convert( unique_ptr<AbstractFoo> absFoo );

// Caller may yield ownership of absFoo:
// (Caller needs to check whether absFoo was moved-from)
template<typename T>
unique_ptr<Foo<T>> Convert( unique_ptr<AbstractFoo>& absFoo );

// Caller may share ownership of absFoo with return value:
template<typename T>
shared_ptr<Foo<T>> Convert( const shared_ptr<AbstractFoo>& absFoo );
share|improve this answer
    
The Convert function is only a utility function meant for internal usage in the library. Requiring the input to be wrapped with a smart pointer has external effects. –  Jack Poulson Aug 15 '14 at 21:14
    
Also, you raise a good point about not accepting a const reference input, and so I have modified the interface in the actual project to accept pointers. –  Jack Poulson Aug 20 '14 at 18:39

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