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I'm planning on developing a web application that will run on a website/server that I will rent for it. The app will require the storage of user information and I heard that MySQL was a good choice for this. I will not be selling the application, it will solely rest on my website for others to use.

If I use MySQL, seeing as it is under the GNU General Public License, will my application have to be open-source, or because I am not selling the app, it does not count as commercial use and I can use MySQL without any penalties?

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Your application doesn't have to be open source. –  Ervald Aug 15 '14 at 22:51
    
No. You would only have to do that if you made a modified version of MySQL and wanted to make a product out of that. –  Barmar Aug 15 '14 at 22:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are only required to have a commercial license for MySQL if you want to modify MySQL and redistribute the changed software for profit, or if you want to embed MySQL in a non-free program, which is not the same as making a connection to MySQL.

The GPL license is talking about modifications to MySQL itself, not general usage. You should be fine :)

source: http://www.xaprb.com/blog/2009/02/17/when-are-you-required-to-have-a-commercial-mysql-license/

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What's the difference between "embed" and "make a connection to" that the author of that article is referring to? –  StrongJoshua Aug 15 '14 at 22:56
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@StrongJoshua For example, if you were making some sort of database software and included parts of MySQL's source in it, and then went on to sell it, that would be considered embedding. Making a connection is just using MySQL to allow your application to interact with a database. –  ChristianTL Aug 15 '14 at 22:59

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