Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using sed to find and replace items in a file:

sed -i "s/$pattern/$replacement/g" ./file.txt

This will replace all appearances in a file.

Is there any way to randomly replace just one of the occurrences within an entire file?

  • The match might appear on any line or even multiple times within a file, but should only be replaced once.
share|improve this question
    
Randomly? Doubt it (but I don't know sed). Once? Get rid of the g. –  ikegami Aug 16 at 4:49

3 Answers 3

Using perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use List::Util qw(shuffle);
use strict;
use warnings;

my $search = shift @ARGV;
my $repl = shift @ARGV;
my @lines;
my @matches;

while (<>) {
    push(@lines, $_);
    push(@matches, $.) if /$search/;
}

my @shuffled = shuffle(@matches);
my $index = shift @shuffled;

if ($index) {
    $lines[$index - 1] =~ s/$search/$repl/;
}

print @lines;

Usage:

perl script.pl string replacement file
share|improve this answer

Using perl, you can use rand function:

perl -lane '
    while ($n = rand @F) { 
        if ($F[$n] eq "pattern") { 
            $F[$n] = "replacement"; 
            print "@F"; 
            last 
        } 
    }
' file

As per this post, variables from the shell are available in perl's %ENV hash. With bash (and some other shells) you need to take the extra step of "exporting" your shell variable so it is visible to subprocesses.

So in your case, you'll have to do:

pattern="mypattern"
replacement="myreplacement"
export pattern
export replacement
perl -lane '
    while ($n = rand @F) { 
        if ($F[$n] eq "$ENV{pattern}") { 
            $F[$n] = "$ENV{replacement}"; 
            print "@F"; 
            last 
        } 
    }
' file

Of course, this will print to STDOUT so if you need to make in-file changes, you can either use -i command line option or redirect the output to another file.

Alternatively, if this is not part of your bash script and you want to do it in perl, then you can pass the pattern and replacement on the command line.

perl -lane '
BEGIN { ($patt, $repl) = splice @ARGV, 1 }
while ($n = rand @F) {
  if ($F[$n] eq $patt) {
    $F[$n] = $repl;
    print "@F";
    last
  }
}' file "pattern" "replacement"

This will do replacement randomly once per line. If you wish to do it once per file, please leave a comment and I will add that version.

share|improve this answer

The only way to do this truly randomly would be to inventory all the locations of the PATTERN first. Otherwise there is no way to give proper weighting.

The following does the replacement via a script. It only replaces the first reference of a pattern on a specific line currently:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my $file = '...';
my $pattern = qr/.../;
my $replace = '...';

my @linenums;
local @ARGV = $file;
while (<>) {
    push @linenums, $_ if $_ =~ $pattern;
}

my $linenum = $linenums[rand @linenums];

local @ARGV = $file;
local $^I = '.bak';
while (<>) {
    s/$pattern/$replace/ if $. == $linenum;
    print;
}
# unlink "$file$^I"; # Optionally Delete backup

Addendum for PATTERN on line more than once.

If you want to allow a pattern to be on a line more than once, the following enhancement would work:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my $file = '...';
my $pattern = qr/.../;
my $replace = '...';

my @linenums;
local @ARGV = $file;
while (<>) {
    my $count = () = $_ =~ /$pattern/g;
    push @linenums, {line => $., num => $_} for 0 .. $count - 1;
}

die "No matches found" unless @linenums;

my $pick = $linenums[rand @linenums];

local @ARGV = $file;
local $^I = '.bak';
while (<>) {
    if ($. == $pick->{line}) {
        s/(?:$pattern.*?){$pick->{num}}\K$pattern/$replace/;
    }
    print;
}
# unlink "$file$^I"; # Optionally Delete backup
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.