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#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  char c;
  c=10;
  if(c%2==0)
    printf("Yes");
  return 0;
}

The above code prints "Yes". Can someone tell why the modulus operator works for char and int but not for double etc.?

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4  
Because char is an integer type. For floating-point types, use fmod(). –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 16 '14 at 13:12
2  
@HotLicks char is an at least 8-bit integer. However, since one can easily define a modulo operation on non-integral numbers, that doesn't really answer the question. (To a "why"-style question, the only answer is probably "because that's how the C standard defines it".) –  The Paramagnetic Croissant Aug 16 '14 at 13:14
2  
@TheParamagneticCroissant: If the question is "why is it so?", then the answer can only be "because the language standard says so". Of course, it's worth pointing out that the characteristics of floating-point arithmetic mean that a "modulo" operator wouldn't always do what one would hope. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 16 '14 at 13:15
2  
@OliCharlesworth and what about other operators? * and / are defined for both integral and floating-point types, although they don't do the same thing either (identities such as a * b / b == a hold for integers, but not for FP types). So why couldn't be % defined as well? Knowing about the inexact nature of floating-point arithmetic, one would expect that a / b * b + a % b != a. (Also, since integers and floating-point numbers are different types, there's no problem defining a certain operation a bit differently on them.) –  The Paramagnetic Croissant Aug 16 '14 at 13:22
2  
I think most of these comments should be answer, not just comments >o< –  ikh Aug 16 '14 at 13:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You already got comments explaining why % is defined for char: it's defined for all integer types, and in C, char is an integer type. Some other languages do define a distinct char type that does not support arithmetic operations, but C is not one of them.

But to answer why it isn't defined for floating-point types: history. There is no technical reason why it wouldn't be possible to define the % operator for floating-point types. Here's what the C99 rationale says:

6.5.5 Multiplicative operators

[...]

The C89 Committee rejected extending the % operator to work on floating types as such usage would duplicate the facility provided by fmod (see §7.12.10.1).

And as mafso found later:

7.12.10.1 The fmod functions

[...]

The C89 Committee considered a proposal to use the remainder operator % for this function; but it was rejected because the operators in general correspond to hardware facilities, and fmod is not supported in hardware on most machines.

They seem somewhat contradictory. The % operator was not extended because fmod already filled that need, but fmod was picked to fill that need because the committee did not want to extend the % operator? They cannot very well both be true at the same time.

I suspect one of these reasons was the original reason, and the other was the reason for not later re-visiting that decision, but there's no telling which was first. Either way, it was simply decided that % wouldn't perform this operation.

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+1 for an authoritative reference. –  chux Aug 16 '14 at 14:31
    
I'd suggest adding (ibid. 7.12.10.1 p.5) “The C89 Committee considered a proposal to use the remainder operator % for this function; but it was rejected because the operators in general correspond to hardware facilities, and fmod is not supported in hardware on most machines.” –  mafso Aug 16 '14 at 14:53
    
@mafso Thanks, but huh, that's odd. That seems to contradict what I found. –  hvd Aug 16 '14 at 14:56
    
It's just another reason given in the same document, though it's a little odd to have "A, because X" at one place and at another "A, because Y" instead of just "A, because X and Y". But I don't see a contradiction. –  mafso Aug 16 '14 at 14:59
    
@mafso I see it more as "A, because B", and "B, because A", and suspect both have been correct at some point, but never both at the same time. –  hvd Aug 16 '14 at 15:06

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