Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In this example I'm using flex-direction:row

http://jsfiddle.net/9a1d2ddz/

When space is not enough to fit elements, a vertical scrollbar appears

I want to achieve the same, but with "top to bottom" box ordering

http://jsfiddle.net/ebd8rsnx/

but instead of getting an horizontal scrollbar I want to keep the vertical one

basically the same of the above, but with top to bottom box ordering instead of left to right

I thought it was something I could do with max-height:min-content but it seems to have no effect.

thank you in advance

div
{
    overflow:auto;
    border:2px blue solid;
    box-sizing:border-box;
    flex-direction:column; /* try column|row */
    display:flex;
    flex-wrap:wrap;
}

span
{
    min-width:150px;
    min-height:150px;
    flex:1 1 auto;
    border:1px red solid;
    display:block;
    overflow:hidden;
    box-sizing:border-box;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I tried specifying the overflow direction, but that doesn't seem to work in this case. I think the problem is that you're trying to make your overflow direction as your wrap direction.
for example, try making it do the same type of thing horizontally. It'll create the same problem because you are attempting to flow and overflow in the same direction. That said, I don't think you'll be able to do what you want with straight css. You may want to consider a js tool like Columnizer or Masonry. The reason being that it can't just flow. It needs to calculate the columns first, then adjust the elements to fill in the columns before it determines its content length in the overflow direction. With a flow, there's no way for a browser to determine when it should break to a new row/column if your overflow is in the same direction as your flow. I've made something like this work before, working horizontal, but the way it worked was to put everything into 1 row, which isn't what you're really going for here.

share|improve this answer

CSS3 "column" feature works well for me: http://caniuse.com/#feat=multicolumn

The column content can be anything, not text-only. Set column-width on the div containing the content, and wrap it into another div with fixed height.

.columns-container {
    max-height: 50vh;
    overflow-y:auto;
}
.columns {
    -webkit-column-width: 15em;
    -moz-column-width: 15em;
    column-width: 15em;
    /*optional column-count*/
    /*
    -webkit-column-count:4;
    -moz-column-count: 4;
    column-count: 4;
    */
    -webkit-column-gap: 0;
    -moz-column-gap: 0;
    column-gap: 0;
}

<div class="columns-container">
    <div class="columns">
        <div>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Sample text 1</div>
        <div>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Sample text 2</div>
        ...
        <div>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Sample text 1000</div>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.