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I am new to OpenMP and find it a little bit hard to understand how locks in OpenMP really work. Here is an example code written in Fortran 90 to do LU factorization. Can anyone explain how locks work in this code?

 program lu

  implicit none
  integer, parameter :: DP=kind(0.0D0),n=20


!--  Variables
  integer :: i,j,k,nthr,thrid,chunk=1
  real(kind=DP), dimension(:,:),allocatable :: A,B,L,U
  real(kind=DP) :: timer,error,walltime
  integer(kind=8), dimension(n)::lck
  integer::omp_get_thread_num,omp_get_max_threads
  nthr=omp_get_max_threads()
  allocate(A(n,n))
  allocate(B(n,n))
  allocate(L(n,n))
  allocate(U(n,n))



!-- Set up locks for each column
  do i=1,n
     call omp_init_lock(lck(i))
  end do

  timer=walltime()
!$OMP PARALLEL PRIVATE(i,j,k,thrid) 
  thrid=omp_get_thread_num();

!-- Initiate matrix
!$OMP DO SCHEDULE(STATIC,chunk)
  do j=1,n
     do i=1,n
        A(i,j)=1.0/(i+j)
     end do
     call omp_set_lock(lck(j))
  end do
!$OMP END DO

!-- First column of L
  if (thrid==0) then
     do i=2,n
        A(i,1)=A(i,1)/A(1,1)
     end do
     call omp_unset_lock(lck(1))     
  end if

!-- LU-factorization
  do k=1,n
      call omp_set_lock(lck(k))
     call omp_unset_lock(lck(k))
!$OMP DO SCHEDULE(STATIC,chunk)
     do j=1,n
        if (j>k) then 
           do i=k+1,n
              A(i,j)=A(i,j)-A(i,k)*A(k,j)
           end do
           if (j==k+1) then
              do i=k+2,n
                 A(i,k+1)=A(i,k+1)/A(k+1,k+1)
              end do
              call omp_unset_lock(lck(k+1))
           end if
        end if
     end do
!$OMP END DO NOWAIT
  end do

!$OMP END PARALLEL
  timer=walltime()-timer

  write(*,*) 'n = ',n,'   time = ',timer,'   nthr = ',nthr

! CHECK CORRECTNESS
  do j=1,n
     L(j,j)=1
     U(j,j)=A(j,j)
     do i=j+1,n
        L(i,j)=A(i,j)
        U(i,j)=0
     end do
     do i=1,j-1
        U(i,j)=A(i,j)
        L(i,j)=0
     end do
  end do
  B=0
  do j=1,n
     do k=1,n
        do i=1,n
           B(i,j)=B(i,j)+L(i,k)*U(k,j)
        end do
     end do
  end do
  error=0.0
  do j=1,n
     do i=1,n
        error=error+abs(1.0/(i+j)-B(i,j))
     end do
  end do

  write(*,*) 'ERROR: ',error

end program lu

Another file is listed below which contains the walltime function. It should be compiled with the main file together.

function walltime()
     integer, parameter:: DP = kind(0.0D0)
     real(DP) walltime
     integer::count,count_rate,count_max
     call system_clock(count,count_rate,count_max)    
     walltime=real(count,DP)/real(count_rate,DP)
end function walltime
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

DISCLAIMER: I don't have experience with the lock mechanism and took a look to the standard to learn, how this will work. I might be wrong...


At first some problems with your code: This code won't compile with a recent version of gfortran. You have to move the function walltime to the contains section of your program and you should use USE omp_lib which defines all necessary functions (and remove the resulting duplicate definitions). Additionally, you have to define your lock in the standard way:

integer(kind=OMP_LOCK_KIND), dimension(n) :: lck

Now to your question: The call to OMP_INIT_LOCK initializes your lck array to unlocked state. All threads will get a copy of this variable. Then the parallel section is started.

In the first loop, the array is initialized as something similar to a Hilbert matrix and each lock is set. The second block is only executed by the first thread and the first lock is released. Still nothing interesting. The following loop is entered by all threads and all threads are waiting for the k-th lock, because omp_set_lock waits, till the lock is acquired. The following omp_unset_lock lets all other threads follow. Due to the already released 1st lock, all threads will immediately enter the inner loop and finally one of the threads will release the next lock. By the time, this thread releases this lock, the other threads might already be waiting for this lock.

In principle, this algorithm provides some form of synchronization, to make sure, that the data, which is required by the k+1-th loop is already calculated, when entering it.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the errors. I myself knows nothing about Fortran. The walltime function is supposed to be placed in a separate file and to be compiled with the main file. I naively put it at the beginning of the main file as we usually do with c/c++. My apology! Thank you very much for your answer. Your explanation is quite clear. And it helps me a lot. – Yvan Aug 18 '14 at 10:15

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