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Okay I got this function who prints the name of all files in a directory recursively problem is that it's very slow and it gets the stuff from a network device and with my current code it has to access the device time after time.

What I would want is to first load all the files from the directory recursively and then after that go through all files with the regex to filter out all the files I don't want. Unless anyone got a better suggestion. I've never before done anything like this.

public static printFnames(String sDir){
  File[] faFiles = new File(sDir).listFiles();
  for(File file: faFiles){
    if(file.getName().matches("^(.*?)")){
      System.out.println(file.getAbsolutePath());
    }
    if(file.isDirectory()){
      printFnames(file.getAbsolutePath());
    }
  }
}

This is just a test later on I'm not going to use the code like this, instead I'm going to add the path and modification date of every file which matches an advanced regex to an array.

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1  
... what's the question? Are you just looking for validation that this code will work? –  Richard JP Le Guen Mar 28 '10 at 21:29
    
No, I know this code works but it's very slow and it feels like it's stupid access the filesystem and get the contents for every subdirectory instead of getting everything at once. –  Hultner Mar 28 '10 at 21:33
    
possible duplicate of Recursively list files in Java –  Luv Jul 3 '13 at 4:53

9 Answers 9

up vote 54 down vote accepted

Assuming this is actual production code you'll be writing, then I suggest using the solution to this sort of thing that's already been solved - Apache Commons IO, specifically FileUtils.listFiles(). It handles nested directories, filters (based on name, modification time, etc).

For example, for your regex:

Collection files = FileUtils.listFiles(
  dir, 
  new RegexFileFilter("^(.*?)"), 
  DirectoryFileFilter.DIRECTORY
);

This will recursively search for files matching the ^(.*?) regex, returning the results as a collection.

It's worth noting that this will be no faster than rolling your own code, it's doing the same thing - trawling a filesystem in Java is just slow. The difference is, the Apache Commons version will have no bugs in it.

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I looked there and from that I would use commons.apache.org/io/api-release/index.html?org/apache/commons/… to get all the file from the directory and subdirectories and then search through the files so that they match my regex. Or am I wrong? –  Hultner Mar 28 '10 at 21:50
    
Yeah problem it takes over an hour to scan the folder and doing that every time I start the program to check for updates is extremely annoying. Would it be faster if I wrote this part of the program in C and the rest in Java and if so would it be any significant difference? For now I changed the code on the if isdir line and added so that the directory also have to match a regex to be included in the search. I see that in your example it says DirectoryFileFilter.DIRECTORY, I guesss I could have a regex filter there. –  Hultner Mar 28 '10 at 23:24
    
writing it using native calls would absolutely make it faster - FindFirstFile/FineNextFile allows you to query the file attributes without having to make a separate call for it - this can have massive implications for higher latency networks. Java's approach to this is horribly inefficient. –  Kevin Day Mar 31 '11 at 3:07

Java's interface for reading filesystem folder contents is not very performant (as you've discovered). JDK 7 fixes this with a completely new interface for this sort of thing, which should bring native level performance to these sorts of operations.

The core issue is that Java makes a native system call for every single file. On a low latency interface, this is not that big of a deal - but on a network with even moderate latency, it really adds up. If you profile your algorithm above, you'll find that the bulk of the time is spent in the pesky isDirectory() call - that's because you are incurring a round trip for every single call to isDirectory(). Most modern OSes can provide this sort of information when the list of files/folders was originally requested (as opposed to querying each individual file path for it's properties).

If you can't wait for JDK7, one strategy for addressing this latency is to go multi-threaded and use an ExecutorService with a maximum # of threads to perform your recursion. It's not great (you have to deal with locking of your output data structures), but it'll be a heck of a lot faster than doing this single threaded.

In all of your discussions about this sort of thing, I highly recommend that you compare against the best you could do using native code (or even a command line script that does roughly the same thing). Saying that it takes an hour to traverse a network structure doesn't really mean that much. Telling us that you can do it native in 7 second, but it takes an hour in Java will get people's attention.

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2  
Java 7 is now there so an example on how to do it in Java 7 would be helpful. Or at least a link. Or a class name to search for on google. — this is «stackoverflow» and not «theoretical cs» after all ;-) . –  Martin Jan 19 '12 at 7:43
3  
well lets see... My original post was in March 2010... It's now January 2012... And I just checked my equipment inventory history, and I don't see myself having had a time machine back in March '10, so I think I'm probably justified in answering without giving explicit example ;-) –  Kevin Day Jan 31 '12 at 23:57
3  
@Martin These are the docs you're looking for. –  trutheality May 9 '12 at 20:32

The fast way to get the content of a directory using Java 7 NIO :

import java.nio.file.DirectoryStream;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.FileSystems;
import java.nio.file.Path;

...

Path dir = FileSystems.getDefault().getPath( filePath );
DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream( dir );
for (Path path : stream) {
   System.out.println( path.getFileName() );
}
stream.close();
share|improve this answer
    
Nice but only gets files for one directory. If you want to see all sub directories see my alternative answer. –  Dan Jun 20 at 9:46
    
Files.newDirectoryStream can throw an IOException. I suggest wrapping that line in a Java7 try-with-statement so that the stream will always be closed for you (exception or not, without the need for a finally). See also here: stackoverflow.com/questions/17739362/… –  Greg Sep 17 at 1:24

With Java 7 a faster way to walk thru a directory tree was introduced with the Paths and Files functionality. They're much faster then the "old" File way.

This would be the code to walk thru and check path names with a regular expression:

public final void test() throws IOException, InterruptedException {
    final Path rootDir = Paths.get("path to your directory where the walk starts");

    // Walk thru mainDir directory
    Files.walkFileTree(rootDir, new FileVisitor<Path>() {
        // First (minor) speed up. Compile regular expression pattern only one time.
        private Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("^(.*?)");

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult preVisitDirectory(Path path,
                BasicFileAttributes atts) throws IOException {

            boolean matches = pattern.matcher(path.toString()).matches();

            // TODO: Put here your business logic when matches equals true/false

            return (matches)? FileVisitResult.CONTINUE:FileVisitResult.SKIP_SUBTREE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path path, BasicFileAttributes mainAtts)
                throws IOException {

            boolean matches = pattern.matcher(path.toString()).matches();

            // TODO: Put here your business logic when matches equals true/false

            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult postVisitDirectory(Path path,
                IOException exc) throws IOException {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFileFailed(Path path, IOException exc)
                throws IOException {
            exc.printStackTrace();

            // If the root directory has failed it makes no sense to continue
            return path.equals(rootDir)? FileVisitResult.TERMINATE:FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
    });
}
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Nice answer :), theres also an implemented class of it called "SimpleFileVisitor", if you don't need all the implemented fucntions, you can just Override the needed functions. –  GalDude33 Mar 23 at 20:56

This is a very simple recursive method to get all files from a given root.

It uses the Java 7 NIO Path class.

private List<String> getFileNames(List<String> fileNames, Path dir){
    try {
        DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream(dir);
        for (Path path : stream) {
            if(path.toFile().isDirectory())getFileNames(fileNames, path);
            else {
                fileNames.add(path.toAbsolutePath().toString());
                System.out.println(path.getFileName());
            }
        }
        stream.close();
    }catch(IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return fileNames;
} 
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This Function will probably list all the file name and its path from its directory and its subdirectories.

public void listFile(String pathname) {
    File f = new File(pathname);
    File[] listfiles = f.listFiles();
    for (int i = 0; i < listfiles.length; i++) {
        if (listfiles[i].isDirectory()) {
            File[] internalFile = listfiles[i].listFiles();
            for (int j = 0; j < internalFile.length; j++) {
                System.out.println(internalFile[j]);
                if (internalFile[j].isDirectory()) {
                    String name = internalFile[j].getAbsolutePath();
                    listFile(name);
                }

            }
        } else {
            System.out.println(listfiles[i]);
        }

    }

}
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1  
This example does not take into account the fact that listFiles() method, can and will return null. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/File.html#listFiles() –  Matt Jones Sep 25 '13 at 4:07

it feels like it's stupid access the filesystem and get the contents for every subdirectory instead of getting everything at once.

Your feeling is wrong. That's how filesystems work. There is no faster way (except when you have to do this repeatedly or for different patterns, you can cache all the file paths in memory, but then you have to deal with cache invalidation i.e. what happens when files are added/removed/renamed while the app runs).

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Thing is I want to load all files of a certain type with a certain name format into a library which is presented to the user and everytime the app is started the library is supposed to be updated but it takes forever to update the library. Only solution I got is to run the update in the background but it's still annoying that it takes so long time until all the new files are loaded. There must be a better way to do it. Or at least a better way to update the database. It feels stupid for it to go through all the files it have already gone through onces. Is there a way to only find updates fast. –  Hultner Mar 28 '10 at 22:14
    
@Hultner: Java 7 will include a facility for getting notified of filesystem updates, but that would still only work while the app is running, so unless you want to have a background service run all the time, it would not help. There might be special issues with network shares as Kevin describes, but as long as you depend on scanning through the entire directory tree, there really is no better way. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 29 '10 at 10:00
    
Perhaps you could create some index files. If there's a way to check the directory size you could simply scan for new files when the size changes. –  James Poulson Feb 7 '11 at 14:05
    
@James: there is no way to check the directory size. The size of a directory is obtained by getting the size for each file and adding them up, in all filesystems I am aware of. Actually, the question "what is the size of this directory?" does not even neccessarily make sense at all if you consider hardlinks. –  Michael Borgwardt Feb 7 '11 at 14:29
    
You're right. I still feel that some caching and/or fingerprinting could speed up the process. –  James Poulson Feb 7 '11 at 15:36

Just so you know isDirectory() is quite a slow method. I'm finding it quite slow in my file browser. I'll be looking into a library to replace it with native code.

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The more efficient way I found in dealing with millions of folders and files is to capture directory listing through DOS command in some file and parse it. Once you have parsed data then you can do analysis and compute statistics.

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