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this is driving me nuts. I believe I asked this exact same question but I can't find it anymore(I used stackoverflow search, google search, manually searched my posts, searched my code).

I wanted something that would be like the C# String.Format where you could do something like

string format = String.Format("Hi {0}",name);

just for javascript of course and one person gave me a simple answer it was not like a jquery plugin or anything but I think you made some json thing or something and it worked and was simple to use.

I for the life of me can't find this post.

I do have this in my code but I can't seem to find anything that uses it and I am pretty sure I used it a couple times.

String.prototype.format = function(o)
{
    return this.replace(/{([^{}]*)}/g,
       function(a, b)
       {
           var r = o[b];
           return typeof r === 'string' ? r : a;
       }
    );
};
share|improve this question
1  
1  
    
No I don't think so. I thought I started the post but I remember seeing those suggestions about the library but this was not some library. –  chobo2 Mar 28 '10 at 22:24

12 Answers 12

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Adapt the code from MsAjax string.

Just remove all of the _validateParams code and you are most of the way to a full fledged .net string class in javascript.

Okay, I liberated the msajax string class, removing all the msajax dependencies. Works great, just like .net string class, including trim functions and endsWith/startsWith etc.

P.S. - I left all of the Visual Studio JavaScript intellisense helpers and XmlDocs in place. They are innocuous if you don't use visual studio but you can remove them if you like.

<script src="script/string.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var a = String.format("Hello {0}!", "world");
    alert(a);

</script>

String.js

// String.js - liberated from MicrosoftAjax.js on 03/28/10 by Sky Sanders 

/*
    Copyright (c) 2009, CodePlex Foundation
    All rights reserved.

    Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted 
    provided that the following conditions are met:

    *   Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions 
        and the following disclaimer.

    *   Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions 
        and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

    *   Neither the name of CodePlex Foundation nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or 
        promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.

    THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS AS IS AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED 
    WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
    A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE 
    FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT 
    LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS 
    INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, 
    OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN 
    IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.</textarea>
*/

(function(window) {

    $type = String;
    $type.__typeName = 'String';
    $type.__class = true;

    $prototype = $type.prototype;
    $prototype.endsWith = function String$endsWith(suffix) {
        /// <summary>Determines whether the end of this instance matches the specified string.</summary>
        /// <param name="suffix" type="String">A string to compare to.</param>
        /// <returns type="Boolean">true if suffix matches the end of this instance; otherwise, false.</returns>
        return (this.substr(this.length - suffix.length) === suffix);
    }

    $prototype.startsWith = function String$startsWith(prefix) {
        /// <summary >Determines whether the beginning of this instance matches the specified string.</summary>
        /// <param name="prefix" type="String">The String to compare.</param>
        /// <returns type="Boolean">true if prefix matches the beginning of this string; otherwise, false.</returns>
        return (this.substr(0, prefix.length) === prefix);
    }

    $prototype.trim = function String$trim() {
        /// <summary >Removes all leading and trailing white-space characters from the current String object.</summary>
        /// <returns type="String">The string that remains after all white-space characters are removed from the start and end of the current String object.</returns>
        return this.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g, '');
    }

    $prototype.trimEnd = function String$trimEnd() {
        /// <summary >Removes all trailing white spaces from the current String object.</summary>
        /// <returns type="String">The string that remains after all white-space characters are removed from the end of the current String object.</returns>
        return this.replace(/\s+$/, '');
    }

    $prototype.trimStart = function String$trimStart() {
        /// <summary >Removes all leading white spaces from the current String object.</summary>
        /// <returns type="String">The string that remains after all white-space characters are removed from the start of the current String object.</returns>
        return this.replace(/^\s+/, '');
    }

    $type.format = function String$format(format, args) {
        /// <summary>Replaces the format items in a specified String with the text equivalents of the values of   corresponding object instances. The invariant culture will be used to format dates and numbers.</summary>
        /// <param name="format" type="String">A format string.</param>
        /// <param name="args" parameterArray="true" mayBeNull="true">The objects to format.</param>
        /// <returns type="String">A copy of format in which the format items have been replaced by the   string equivalent of the corresponding instances of object arguments.</returns>
        return String._toFormattedString(false, arguments);
    }

    $type._toFormattedString = function String$_toFormattedString(useLocale, args) {
        var result = '';
        var format = args[0];

        for (var i = 0; ; ) {
            // Find the next opening or closing brace
            var open = format.indexOf('{', i);
            var close = format.indexOf('}', i);
            if ((open < 0) && (close < 0)) {
                // Not found: copy the end of the string and break
                result += format.slice(i);
                break;
            }
            if ((close > 0) && ((close < open) || (open < 0))) {

                if (format.charAt(close + 1) !== '}') {
                    throw new Error('format stringFormatBraceMismatch');
                }

                result += format.slice(i, close + 1);
                i = close + 2;
                continue;
            }

            // Copy the string before the brace
            result += format.slice(i, open);
            i = open + 1;

            // Check for double braces (which display as one and are not arguments)
            if (format.charAt(i) === '{') {
                result += '{';
                i++;
                continue;
            }

            if (close < 0) throw new Error('format stringFormatBraceMismatch');


            // Find the closing brace

            // Get the string between the braces, and split it around the ':' (if any)
            var brace = format.substring(i, close);
            var colonIndex = brace.indexOf(':');
            var argNumber = parseInt((colonIndex < 0) ? brace : brace.substring(0, colonIndex), 10) + 1;

            if (isNaN(argNumber)) throw new Error('format stringFormatInvalid');

            var argFormat = (colonIndex < 0) ? '' : brace.substring(colonIndex + 1);

            var arg = args[argNumber];
            if (typeof (arg) === "undefined" || arg === null) {
                arg = '';
            }

            // If it has a toFormattedString method, call it.  Otherwise, call toString()
            if (arg.toFormattedString) {
                result += arg.toFormattedString(argFormat);
            }
            else if (useLocale && arg.localeFormat) {
                result += arg.localeFormat(argFormat);
            }
            else if (arg.format) {
                result += arg.format(argFormat);
            }
            else
                result += arg.toString();

            i = close + 1;
        }

        return result;
    }

})(window);
share|improve this answer
1  
I didn't know that it was possible for Javascript to look like C ... :-D. Very nice work Sky, thanks for taking the time to comment it! –  Sean Vieira Mar 28 '10 at 22:47
1  
@Sean, I didn't write the code or comments, I just took the string class from msajax and removed/replaced all of the external dependencies. This gives you a lot of very useful and familiar string functions from .net. I figure if you are going to do something, do it right. Trivial, brittle string munging snippets are a recipe for a headache. –  Sky Sanders Mar 28 '10 at 22:53
    
Hmm I will check this out in a couple mins. Thanks but do you have to make everything a string? Like could I have a variable where "World" is like the String.Format takes in an object. Also is there a limit of how many place holders you can send in. I know String.Format after 3 place holders you got to send in an array in. –  chobo2 Mar 28 '10 at 22:59
    
@chobo2 - no, just as in .net, every object in js has a .toString function. Pass anything you want. Unlike .net, the arguments object makes it easy to accept any number of arguments, so just keep adding as many as you want. String.format("{0},....",true,"aString",new Date(),["a","b"]); make sense? –  Sky Sanders Mar 28 '10 at 23:49
    
All but the last one. would that be an array so it would fill up place holder {3} & {4}? –  chobo2 Mar 29 '10 at 0:10

Here is what I use. I have this function defined in a utility file:

  String.format = function() {
      var s = arguments[0];
      for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length - 1; i++) {       
          var reg = new RegExp("\\{" + i + "\\}", "gm");             
          s = s.replace(reg, arguments[i + 1]);
      }
      return s;
  }

And I call it like so:

var greeting = String.format("Hi, {0}", name);

I do not recall where I found this, but it has been very useful to me. I like it because the syntax is the same as the C# version.

share|improve this answer
3  
You probably got it from Microsoft Ajax lib: stackoverflow.com/a/1038930/114029 –  Leniel Macaferi Jun 30 '13 at 4:11
    
I got some bugs from this function –  Salvatore Di Fazio Jun 11 at 8:38

You can do series of replaces like that:

function format(str)
{
    for(i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++)
    {
        str = str.replace('{' + (i - 1) + '}', arguments[i]);
    }
    return str;
}

Better approach will be to use replace with function parameter:

function format(str, obj) {
    return str.replace(/\{\s*([^}\s]+)\s*\}/g, function(m, p1, offset, string) {
        return obj[p1]
    })
}

This way you can provide both indices and named parameters:

var arr = ['0000', '1111', '2222']

arr.a = 'aaaa'

str = format(" { 0 } , {1}, { 2}, {a}", arr)
// returns 0000, 1111, 2222, aaaa
share|improve this answer
    
@Ismail: take a look at history of changes it was reformated with wrong quot char –  vittore Mar 9 '11 at 19:40
1  
+1 Thanks. Works great now. Check it here on JsFiddle –  iSid Mar 10 '11 at 6:22
    
Doesn't work with 'Foo {0}{1}' –  DalSoft Nov 17 '12 at 22:41
    
@DalSoft jsfiddle.net/9Jpkv/5 seems to work for me. –  vittore Nov 18 '12 at 9:48
    
@vittore jsfiddle.net/9Jpkv/5 working fine +1 –  DalSoft Nov 21 '12 at 17:05

Without a third party function:

string format = "Hi {0}".replace('{0}', name)

With multiple params:

string format = "Hi {0} {1}".replace('{0}', name).replace('{1}', lastname)
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm well look at what I posted as I am not sure what is exactly does but it is using replace. Like I said I remember it used json or maybe and array of stuff. So it might be just a more elaborate way of what your doing. –  chobo2 Mar 28 '10 at 22:36
    
Yes, I am not sure what post you are looking for, this is a simple alternative using built in JS functions. –  Dustin Laine Mar 28 '10 at 22:46
2  
"Hi {0} {1}. {0}. ".replace('{0}', "John").replace('{1}', "Smith"); returns "Hi John Smith. {0}." –  iSid Sep 20 '10 at 5:19
1  
This doesn't work as only the first {0} will get replaced! –  DotNetWise Feb 28 '13 at 3:29

Aside from the fact that you are modifying the String prototype, there is nothing wrong with the function you provided. The way you would use it is this way:

"Hello {0},".format(["Bob"]);

If you wanted it as a stand-alone function, you could alter it slightly to this:

function format(string, object) {
    return string.replace(/{([^{}]*)}/g,
       function(match, group_match)
       {
           var data = object[group_match];
           return typeof data === 'string' ? data : match;
       }
    );
}

Vittore's method is also good; his function is called with each additional formating option being passed in as an argument, while yours expects an object.

What this actually looks like is John Resig's micro-templating engine.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: After re-reading this entry, Sean beat me to the "your function already does this" answer. If you pass an array (as Sean's example shows) to the format function, index [0] will map to "Bob". –  David Mar 28 '10 at 23:11

Your function already takes a JSON object as a parameter:

string format = "Hi {foo}".replace({
    "foo": "bar",
    "fizz": "buzz"
});

if you notice, the code:

var r = o[b];

looks at your parameter (o) and uses a key-value-pairs within it to resolve the "replace"

share|improve this answer
    
Since you are defining a String function prototype, you may run into problems if 3rd party JS on your page attempts to do the same (unlikely but possible). –  David Mar 28 '10 at 22:57
    
I think that is exactly it. How could I search for this in my code to see if I am using it. Like in VS javascript files you can't go search for all references and the only ones I seen so far are Jquery.format what I believe is different. –  chobo2 Mar 28 '10 at 23:26
    
Multi-file find (in each HTML, PHP/ASP/JSP, and JS) for ".replace" (you may need to escape the "." if you are doing a RegEx). False positives will be applied to JQuery objects (which are not strings themselves). –  David Mar 29 '10 at 5:09

Based on @roydukkey's answer, a bit more optimized for runtime (it caches the regexes):

(function () {
    if (!String.prototype.format) {
        var regexes = {};
        String.prototype.format = function (parameters) {
            for (var formatMessage = this, args = arguments, i = args.length; --i >= 0;)
                formatMessage = formatMessage.replace(regexes[i] || (regexes[i] = RegExp("\\{" + (i) + "\\}", "gm")), args[i]);
            return formatMessage;
        };
        if (!String.format) {
            String.format = function (formatMessage, params) {
                for (var args = arguments, i = args.length; --i;)
                    formatMessage = formatMessage.replace(regexes[i - 1] || (regexes[i - 1] = RegExp("\\{" + (i - 1) + "\\}", "gm")), args[i]);
                return formatMessage;
            };
        }
    }
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Looks okay, but you should surely namespace the variable, 'regexes', so it's not globally available. –  roydukkey Mar 1 '13 at 18:51
    
Just wrapped it in an anonymous self executed function –  DotNetWise Mar 2 '13 at 19:46
    
Right. I didn't know know the solution you preferred. I might have gone with something like String.format.cache. Nevertheless, to each his own. Thanks. –  roydukkey Mar 4 '13 at 14:50

String.Format method from .NET Framework has multiple signatures. The one I like the most uses params keyword in its prototype, i.e.:

public static string Format(
    string format,
    params Object[] args
)

Using this version, you can not only pass variable number of arguments to it but also an array argument.

Because I like the straightforward solution provided by Jeremy, I'd like to extend it a bit:

var StringHelpers = {
    format: function(format, args) {
        var i;
        if (args instanceof Array) {
            for (i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
                format = format.replace(new RegExp('\\{' + i + '\\}', 'gm'), args[i]);
            }
            return format;
        }
        for (i = 0; i < arguments.length - 1; i++) {
            format = format.replace(new RegExp('\\{' + i + '\\}', 'gm'), arguments[i + 1]);
        }
        return format;
    }
};

Now you can use your JavaScript version of String.Format in the following manners:

StringHelpers.format("{0}{1}", "a", "b")

and

StringHelpers.format("{0}{1}", ["a", "b"])
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this version lent itself well to a typescript version: gist.github.com/fauxtrot/8349c9bd2708a8fa8455 –  Todd Richardson Jun 17 at 15:34
    
@Todd: You're welcome. I'm glad it helped. –  Jaroslaw Waliszko Jun 17 at 16:21

Just make and use this function:

function format(str, args) {
   for (i = 0; i < args.length; i++)
      str = str.replace("{" + i + "}", args[i]);
   return str;
}

If you don't want to change str parameter, then before the for loop, clone (duplicate) it to a new string (make a new copy of str), and set the copy in the for loop and at last return it instead the parameter itself.

In C# (Sharp) it is simple create copy by just calling String.Clone(), but I don't know how in Javascript, but you can search on google or surf on the internet and learn ways to do it.

I just gave you my idea about string format in javascript.

share|improve this answer

Here is an solution that allows both prototype and function options.

// --------------------------------------------------------------------
// Add prototype for 'String.format' which is c# equivalent
//
// String.format("{0} i{2}a night{1}", "This", "mare", "s ");
// "{0} i{2}a night{1}".format("This", "mare", "s ");
// --------------------------------------------------------------------

if(!String.format)
    String.format = function(){
        for (var i = 0, args = arguments; i < args.length - 1; i++)
            args[0] = args[0].replace("{" + i + "}", args[i + 1]);
        return args[0];
    };
if(!String.prototype.format && String.format)
    String.prototype.format = function(){
        var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments).reverse();
        args.push(this);
        return String.format.apply(this, args.reverse())
    };

Enjoy.

share|improve this answer

Here is a useful string formatting function using regular expressions and captures:

function format (fmtstr) {
  var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
  return fmtstr.replace(/\{(\d+)\}/g, function (match, index) {
    return args[index];
  });
}

Strings can be formatted like C# String.Format:

var str = format('{0}, {1}!', 'Hello', 'world');
console.log(str); // prints "Hello, world!"

the format will place the correct variable in the correct spot, even if they appear out of order:

var str = format('{1}, {0}!', 'Hello', 'world');
console.log(str); // prints "world, Hello!"

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Here's a solution that just works with String.prototype:

String.prototype.format = function() {
    var s = this;
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {       
        var reg = new RegExp("\\{" + i + "\\}", "gm");             
        s = s.replace(reg, arguments[i]);
    }
    return s;
}
share|improve this answer

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