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how to write a method that accepts two square matrices (nxn two dimensional arrays), and return the sum of the two. Both matrices being passed into the method will be of size nxn (square), containing only integers.

How to sum two matrices: Take each cell [n][m] from the first matrix, and add it with the [n][m] cell from the second matrix. This will be cell [n][m] in the solution matrix.

like:

|1 2 3|
|3 2 1|
|1 1 1|
+
|2 2 1|
|3 2 3|
|1 1 3|
=
|3 4 4|
|6 4 4|
|2 2 4|



matrix_addition( [ [1, 2, 3], [3, 2, 1,], [1, 1, 1] ], [ [2, 2, 1], [3, 2, 3], [1, 1, 3] ] )
returns [ [3, 4, 4], [6, 4, 4], [2, 2, 4] ]
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have you tried anything? what have you tried? –  Uri Agassi Aug 17 '14 at 12:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Even though it is possible to define method to do so, it is much easier to use ruby build in Matrix library for this:

require 'matrix'

m1 = Matrix[ [1, 2, 3], [3, 2, 1], [1, 1, 1] ]
m2 = Matrix[ [2, 2, 1], [3, 2, 3], [1, 1, 3] ]

sum = m1 + m2
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...and sum.to_a to convert the Matrix object sum to an array. The arrays being added needn't be square; they simply mmust have the same number of rows and the same number of columns. –  Cary Swoveland Aug 17 '14 at 13:20

Yes, certainly, use the Matrix class methods, but here is a way using recursion that might be of interest.

Code

def sum_arrays(a1, a2)
  t = a1.zip(a2)
  t.map { |e1,e2| (e1.is_a? Array) ? sum_arrays(e1,e2) : e1+e2 }
end

Examples

a1 = [1,2,3]
a2 = [4,5,6]
sum_arrays(a1, a2)
  #=> [5, 7, 9]

a1 = [[1,2,3], [4,5]]
a2 = [[6,7,8], [9,10]]
sum_arrays(a1, a2)
  #=> [[7, 9, 11], [13, 15]]

a1 = [[[ 1,  2,  3], [ 4,  5]],
      [[ 6,  7], [ 8,  9, 10]]] 
a2 = [[[11, 12, 13], [14, 15]],
      [[16, 17], [18, 19, 20]]]
sum_arrays(a1, a2)
 #=> [[[12, 14, 16], [18, 20]],
 #    [[22, 24], [26, 28, 30]]]

Generalization

You could make greater use of this method by passing an operator.

Code

def op_arrays(a1, a2, op)
  t = a1.zip(a2)
  t.map { |e1,e2| (e1.is_a? Array) ? op_arrays(e1,e2,op) : e1.send(op,e2) }
end

Examples

a1 = [[1,2,3], [4,5]]
a2 = [[6,7,8], [9,10]]

op_arrays(a1, a2, '+') #=> [[7, 9, 11], [13, 15]]
op_arrays(a1, a2, '-') #=> [[-5, -5, -5], [-5, -5]]
op_arrays(a1, a2, '*') #=> [[6, 14, 24], [36, 50]]

You could alternatively pass the operator as a symbol:

op_arrays(a1, a2, :+)
  #=> [[7, 9, 11], [13, 15]]
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Have you used ruby Matrix class? It has #+ operator (mimic method).

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2  
As your answer adds nothing to @BroiSatse's earlier one, you should remove it [your's, not his :-)]. –  Cary Swoveland Aug 17 '14 at 13:41
    
Well, I didn't know about his answer before. We were answering the question at about the same time. Come to think of it, I add link to the Matrix class so that the asker can study the Matrix#+ operator properly. :-) –  styd Aug 17 '14 at 14:43
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Marco A. Aug 24 '14 at 15:37

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