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I was looking at the Java code for LinkedList and noticed that it made use of a static nested class, Entry.

public class LinkedList<E> ... {
...

 private static class Entry<E> { ... }

}

What is the reason for using a static nested class, rather than an normal inner class?

The only reason I could think of, was that Entry doesn't have access to instance variables, so from an OOP point of view it has better encapsulation.

But I thought there might be other reasons, maybe performance. What might it be?

Note. I hope I have got my terms correct, I would have called it a static inner class, but I think this is wrong: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/javaOO/nested.html

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11 Answers 11

up vote 117 down vote accepted

The Sun page you link to has some key differences between the two:

A nested class is a member of its enclosing class. Non-static nested classes (inner classes) have access to other members of the enclosing class, even if they are declared private. Static nested classes do not have access to other members of the enclosing class.
...

Note: A static nested class interacts with the instance members of its outer class (and other classes) just like any other top-level class. In effect, a static nested class is behaviorally a top-level class that has been nested in another top-level class for packaging convenience.

There is no need for LinkedList.Entry to be top-level class as it is only used by LinkedList (there are some other interfaces that also have static nested classes named Entry, such as Map.Entry - same concept). And since it does not need access to LinkedList's members, it makes sense for it to be static - it's a much cleaner approach.

As Jon Skeet points out, I think it is a better idea if you are using a nested class is to start off with it being static, and then decide if it really needs to be non-static based on your usage.

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1  
Is there a link to where Mr. Skeet points this out? Thanks. –  Glenn Jan 25 '12 at 20:27
2  
The next post down. –  Louis Wasserman May 19 '12 at 17:27
    
Bah, I can't seem to get an anchor link to the comment to work, but its this comment: #comment113712_253507 –  Zach L Nov 1 '12 at 18:23
    
@matt b If a static nested class doesn't have access to the instance members of the Outer class , how does it interact with the instance members of the Outer class? –  Geek Sep 3 '13 at 14:21
2  
@Geek it doesn't. –  matt b Sep 25 '13 at 15:11

To my mind, the question ought to be the other way round whenever you see an inner class - does it really need to be an inner class, with the extra complexity and the implicit (rather than explicit and clearer, IMO) reference to an instance of the containing class?

Mind you, I'm biased as a C# fan - C# doesn't have the equivalent of inner classes, although it does have nested types. I can't say I've missed inner classes yet :)

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C# has inner classes... csharphelp.com/archives/archive113.html –  chills42 Oct 31 '08 at 13:44
3  
I could be wrong, but that looks to me like an example of a static nested class, not an inner class. They even specify in the example that they don't have access to instance variables on the surrounding class in the nested class. –  ColinD Oct 31 '08 at 16:28
    
Yup, Colin's right - C# doesn't have inner classes, it has nested classes. Mind you, a static nested class in C# isn't the same as a static nested class in Java :) –  Jon Skeet Oct 31 '08 at 17:13
    
Nested types are one of those areas where C# got it extremely correct compared to Java. I always marvel at its semantic/logical correctness.. –  nawfal Dec 16 '13 at 10:24
1  
@nawfal: Yes, barring a few niggles I'm in awe of how well the C# language has been designed (and specified). –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '13 at 11:33

There are non-obvious memory retention issues to take into account here. Since a non-static inner class maintains an implicit reference to it's 'outer' class, if an instance of the inner class is strongly referenced, then the outer instance is strongly referenced too. This can lead to some head-scratching when the outer class is not garbage collected, even though it appears that nothing references it.

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Well, for one thing, non-static inner classes have an extra, hidden field that points to the instance of the outer class. So if the Entry class weren't static, then besides having access that it doesn't need, it would carry around four pointers instead of three.

As a rule, I would say, if you define a class that's basically there to act as a collection of data members, like a "struct" in C, consider making it static.

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Simple example :

package test;

public class UpperClass {
public static class StaticInnerClass {}

public class InnerClass {}

public static void main(String[] args) {
	// works
	StaticInnerClass stat = new StaticInnerClass();
	// doesn't compile
	InnerClass inner = new InnerClass();
}
}

If non-static the class cannot be instantiated exept in an instance of the upper class (so not in the example where main is a static function)

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One of the reasons for static vs. normal have to do with classloading. You cannot instantiate an inner class in the constructor of it's parent.

PS: I've always understood 'nested' and 'inner' to be interchangeable. There may be subtle nuances in the terms but most Java developers would understand either.

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Non static inner classes can result in memory leaks while static inner class will protect against them. If the outer class holds considerable data, it can lower the performance of the application.

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This is great! Any sources that we could read from about this? –  despot May 2 '12 at 8:20

From http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/whentouse.html:

Use a non-static nested class (or inner class) if you require access to an enclosing instance's non-public fields and methods. Use a static nested class if you don't require this access.

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static nested class is just like any other outer class, as it doesn't have access to outer class members.

Just for packaging convenience we can club static nested classes into one outer class for readability purpose. Other than this there is no other use case of static nested class.

Example for such kind of usage, you can find in Android R.java (resources) file. Res folder of android contains layouts (containing screen designs), drawable folder (containing images used for project), values folder (which contains string constants), etc..

Sine all the folders are part of Res folder, android tool generates a R.java (resources) file which internally contains lot of static nested classes for each of their inner folders.

Here is the look and feel of R.java file generated in android: Here they are using only for packaging convenience.

/* AUTO-GENERATED FILE.  DO NOT MODIFY.
 *
 * This class was automatically generated by the
 * aapt tool from the resource data it found.  It
 * should not be modified by hand.
 */

package com.techpalle.b17_testthird;

public final class R {
    public static final class drawable {
        public static final int ic_launcher=0x7f020000;
    }
    public static final class layout {
        public static final int activity_main=0x7f030000;
    }
    public static final class menu {
        public static final int main=0x7f070000;
    }
    public static final class string {
        public static final int action_settings=0x7f050001;
        public static final int app_name=0x7f050000;
        public static final int hello_world=0x7f050002;
    }
}
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I don't know about performance difference, but as you say, static nested class is not a part of an instance of the enclosing class. Seems just simpler to create a static nested class unless you really need it to be an inner class.

It's a bit like why I always make my variables final in Java - if they're not final, I know there's something funny going on with them. If you use an inner class instead of a static nested class, there should be a good reason.

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As per Oracle site below are key benefits using nested class (static or non-static) refer: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/nested.html

Why Use Nested Classes?

Compelling reasons for using nested classes include the following:

It is a way of logically grouping classes that are only used in one place: If a class is useful to only one other class, then it is
logical to embed it in that class and keep the two together. Nesting such "helper classes" makes their package more streamlined.

It increases encapsulation: Consider two top-level classes, A and B,
where B needs access to members of A that would otherwise be declared private. By hiding class B within class A, A's members can be declared private and B can access them. In addition, B itself can be hidden from the outside world.

It can lead to more readable and maintainable code: Nesting small classes within top-level classes places the code closer to where it is used

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