Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Give me a situation where we need to use the super class reference to a subclass object in Java.Please give me a real time example.

Thx

share|improve this question
    
is this homework? –  matt b Mar 29 '10 at 2:55
    
No ..Interview question. –  JavaUser Mar 29 '10 at 2:58
    
You mean the superclass has an explicit reference to an instance of a subclass??? –  harto Mar 29 '10 at 3:10
3  
@JavaUser - lookup the definition of realtime. –  Stephen C Mar 29 '10 at 3:26
2  
@ultrajohn - I guess he does too. But he needs to understand the difference between "real life" and "realtime" and use the appropriate term. In other contexts, getting these two terms mixed up could be really confusing. –  Stephen C Mar 29 '10 at 4:25

9 Answers 9

To Take Full Advantage of polymorphism...You have to understand polymorphism fully for you to really appreciate this... You can actually achieve the same behavior using an Interface as appropriate, so they say...

abstract class Shape {

    abstract double getArea();

}

class Rectangle extends Shape{
    double h, w;

    public Rectangle(double h, double w){

        this.h = h;
        this.w = w;
    }

    public double getArea(){
        return h*w;
    }
}

class Circle extends Shape{
    double radius;

    public Circle(double radius){
        this.radius = radius;
    }

    public double getArea(){
        return Math.PI * Math.sqrt(radius);
    }
}

class Triangle extends Shape{
    double b, h;

    public Triangle(double b, double h){
        this.b = b;
        this.h = h;
    }

    public double getArea(){
        return (b*h)/2;
    }


}

public class ShapeT{
    public static void main(String args[]){

    //USAGE
    //Without polymorphism
    Triangle t = new Triangle(3, 2);
    Circle c = new Circle(3);
    Rectangle r = new Rectangle(2,3);

    System.out.println(t.getArea());
    System.out.println(c.getArea());
    System.out.println(r.getArea());

    //USAGE with Polymorphism

    Shape s[] = new Shape[3];
    s[0] = new Triangle(3, 2);
    s[1] = new Circle(3);;
    s[2] = new Rectangle(2,3);

    for(Shape shape:s){
        System.out.println(shape.getArea());
    }

    }
}

I hope I'm not wrong on this... just a thought!

share|improve this answer
    
This code is just regular inheritance - I think the question is asking for an example where you would put say a reference to Circle inside the definition of Shape. –  Mark Rhodes Apr 13 '12 at 19:28
    
forgive my english, then I must have misunderstood the question. If you're right, then the question to be more intelligible at least for me should have been, "Give me a situation where we need a super class to reference to a subclass object in Java, where the superclass is the parentclass of the subclass". wew –  ultrajohn Apr 14 '12 at 2:16

That question doesn't seem quite right ... putting an explicit reference to a child-class in the parent-class seems like an intent to break the hierarchy and the library.

As soon as the parent-class starts to carry a reference to the child-class, the parent-class is dependant upon knowing it's descendants; that is bad.

Unless the question was misquoted here, I'd say your interviewer was talking through his hat.

share|improve this answer

Using this kind of assignment you can not call the overloaded method in the subclass which is not in super class.

  public class Reference {


    public static void main(String args[]){
        A a = new B();
        //B b = new A(); // You can not do this, compilation error
        a.msg(); // calls the subclass method
        ((B)a).msg("Custom Message"); // You have to type cast to call this
        System.out.println(a.getClass());
        if(a instanceof B){//true
            System.out.println("a is instance of B");
        }
        if(a instanceof A){//true
            System.out.println("a is instance of A also");
        }


    }
}

class A{
    public void msg(){
        System.out.println("Message from A");
    }
}

class B extends A{
    public void msg(){//override
        System.out.println("Message from B");
    }
    public void msg(String msg){//overload
        System.out.println(msg);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Good explanation..:) –  John Dec 2 '13 at 6:57

I know this is old but this cropped up on a project I've been working on recently (just a junior developer doing something unexpected - there was no actual reason for it!) and I think some of the answers have missed the point..

This has nothing to do with normal polymorphism; I think the question relates to the case where the code looks like this:

class A {
    B b; //odd reference here..
}
class B extends A {
}

Where the sub-class is used in the definition of the super-class. As far a I can tell there is no legitimate reason for coding something like this yourself, however the reason the language allows you to do this is that it's required for some of the core Java classes e.g. Object.

For example, although it doesn't store a reference to it, the code for Object creates and returns a String object in it's default toString method, however, String is a sub-class of Object.

It's interesting to note that although it's technically allowed, it doesn't make sense to have a superclass create a subclass instance in its constructor.

e.g.

class A {
    B b;
    A(){
        b = new B();
    }
}
class B extends A {
}

This will just crash due to the fact that it creates an infinite loop, since B's constructor is calling A's constructor, which is calling B's constructor etc..

share|improve this answer
    
have you tested this code, and see that it really behaved as you expected? thanks! –  ultrajohn Apr 14 '12 at 2:17
    
Are you talking about the second bit? I've tested it and it causes a problem (on my version of the compiler at least) when you create a new A instance. Note that if the compiler is clever enough it would remove the reference to b in A since it's not used. –  Mark Rhodes Apr 14 '12 at 17:43
    
forgive my laziness, what's the error produced? thanks! –  ultrajohn Apr 17 '12 at 8:23
    
java.lang.StackOverflowError –  Mark Rhodes Apr 17 '12 at 8:37
    
aah, thanks! so you were right... hehe –  ultrajohn Apr 17 '12 at 10:43

Uh, any time? If you have something like a polymorphic linked list:

class Node {
   has 'next' => ( isa => 'Node' );
}

class TextNode extends Node {
   has 'text' => ( isa => 'Str' );
}

class ImageNode extends Node {
   has 'image' => ( isa => 'Image' );
}

Then you can do:

TextNode->new( 
    text => 'Here is my cat:', 
    next => ImageNode->new(
        image => 'nibbler.jpg',
        next  => undef,
    ),
);

Your specific situation involves Node holding a reference to TextNode or ImageNode, which is probably fine in Java:

 Node->new( next => TextNode->new ( ... ) )

Though I would make Node a role in languages with that feature... the idea is largely the same.

The Liskov substitution principle states that subclasses should behave exactly like their superclasses, so you can substitute a subclass anywhere the superclass is used.

share|improve this answer
2  
"Node->new( next => TextNode->new ( ... ) )" ... that ain't Java! –  TofuBeer Mar 29 '10 at 7:08

One of the strong features of java is that it is follows a OOPs concept, and one of the feature of OOP in java is that, we can assign a subclass object or variable to the variable of the superclass type.

In this example we have a class named Rectangle which is the superclass of class Square, and Square is a superclass of Triangle. We can assign the object references of class Square to the variable of Rectangle, as well as the object references of class Rectangle.

<head>
        <title>To Use Superclass Variables With Subclassed Objects</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <h1>To Use Superclass Variables With Subclassed Objects</h1>

        <%!
            javax.servlet.jsp.JspWriter pw;
            class Rectangle
            {
                public void areaOfRectangle() throws java.io.IOException 
                {
                    pw.println("Starting...<br>");
                }
            }
            class Square extends Rectangle
            {
                public void area() throws java.io.IOException 
                {
                    pw.println("Creating...<br>");
                }
            }
            class Triangle extends Square
            {
                public void area() throws java.io.IOException 
                {
                    pw.println("Creating...<br>");
                }
            }
        %>     
        <%
            pw = out;     
            out.println();
            out.println("Creating an Area...<br>");
            Rectangle p = new Triangle();
            p.areaOfRectangle();
        %>
    </body>
</html> 
share|improve this answer
    
thx Giri, But here I need the reason for the need.Please explain the code ? –  JavaUser Mar 29 '10 at 3:17
1  
Why in earth are you abusing JSP for this? Talking about OOP.. –  BalusC Mar 29 '10 at 3:34
    
How do we say Square is a super class of Triangle ? –  JavaUser Mar 29 '10 at 3:38
2  
And since when does Square extend a Rectangle, or a Triangle extend Square..? A square is just a rectangle with artificial data entry / modification constraints (not sufficient to create a new subclass), and triangle isn't even close to square. If you wanted different methods of drawing shapes and getting their properties, this would be better supported by the interface pattern. –  Chris Dennett Mar 29 '10 at 3:42
1  
Oh God, this example .... –  ultrajohn Mar 29 '10 at 4:05

Here's an important and most instructive example: java.lang.reflect.Array:

The Array class provides static methods to dynamically create and access Java arrays.

  • getLength(Object array)
    • Returns the length of the specified array object, as an int.
  • get(Object array, int index)
    • Returns the value of the indexed component in the specified array object.
  • set(Object array, int index, Object value)
    • Sets the value of the indexed component of the specified array object to the specified new value.

Arrays are passed around as Object, which is the superclass of all array types. It's necessary because we're doing reflection: we don't always know what the array type will be at compile time.

share|improve this answer
    
How is this an example of the original question? –  EJP Mar 29 '10 at 9:27
    
java.lang.reflect.Array is "a situation where we need to use the super class reference " (Object) "to a subclass object" (whether it be an int[], String[], Foo[][], Bar[][][], etc). It's a "real time example" (whatever that means) of where this is pretty much necessary. This is as good of an example as any! I strongly object to your downvote. –  polygenelubricants Mar 29 '10 at 9:30

It's really rather odd because the type of situation where it might be useful (supplying a custom implementation of a singleton object for instance) has better alternatives to that; in particular the service loader mechanism.

And outside the world of globals in disguise you do tend to run into issues with circular references. (Consider that the super reference within your sub-class field points to the enclosing super instance which in turn is a reference from within the sub-class ...)

share|improve this answer
class Person
String hairColor = "default_noColor";
-----------------------------
class German extends Person
String hairColor = "brown";
-----------------------------
class Scandinavian extends Person
String hairColor = "red";
-----------------------------
public static void main(String args[]) {
    Person p = new Person();
    German g = new German();
    Scandinavian s = new Scandinavian();
    sysout p.hairColor // prints default_noColor
    if (cond1) {
        p = g;
    }
    sysout p.hairColor // prints brown
    else if (cond2) {
        p = s;
    }
    sysout p.hairColor // prints red
}

now, if germans start having black hair, i recompile class German and the main() is totally agnostic of how the German has changed. The main method continues to work as if nothing ever happened and prints black.
Kindly excuse minimal grammar and syntax

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.