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hey , I'd like to make a recursive function using C++

I make this class

class linklist
{
private:
  struct node
  {
    int data;
    node *link;
  }*p;
};

void linklist::print_num(node* p)
{
  if (p != NULL) 
  {
    cout << p->data << " ";
    print_num (p->link);
  }
}

in the main program what should I write ...

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closed as not a real question by SingerOfTheFall, UmNyobe, Ragunath Jawahar, cpilko, C. A. McCann Nov 8 '12 at 13:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You did not specify what the function should do. –  Enrique Mar 29 '10 at 3:29
    
Um, recursion doesn't make sense for traversing a linked list... –  egrunin Mar 29 '10 at 3:30
7  
Your print_num method already is recursive... –  Dean Harding Mar 29 '10 at 3:33
4  
@egrunin Why not? Compilers will do appropriate transformation for tail-recursion. –  ony Mar 29 '10 at 3:59
    
Whatever you need to do to fill the linked list with data and call print_num on it. –  GManNickG Mar 29 '10 at 4:05

1 Answer 1

1: Build the list
2: Retain the first node
3: print_num on the first node

I had to change a lot in your code to make it work. I'm guessing you used to write Java...

But in my main I get:

node *first = NULL;
for (int i = 10; i > 0; i--) {
    node *temp =  new node;
    temp->data = i;
    temp->link = first; 
    first = temp;
}

linklist::print_num(first);

UPDATE 1:

Ok, apparently you didn't get what you should do with this piece of code, so I am now posting the whole thing for you. Consider yourself very lucky, and try to learn from it. If you still have issues please make your question/requirements clearer.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct node {  
    int data;
    node *link;
};

class linklist {
public:

    static void print_num(node* p) {
    if (p != NULL)    {   
           cout << p->data << " ";
        print_num (p->link);    
       }
    }
};

int main() {
    node *first = NULL;
    for (int i = 10; i > 0; i--) {
        node *temp =  new node;
        temp->data = i;
        temp->link = first; 
        first = temp;
    }

    linklist::print_num(first);

    return 0;
}

UPDATE 2:

After your code was reformatted, I noticed that you wanted to keep the node struct hidden. To be able to do that, you do need an add method in your class which can add the nodes and a print method which you can call without a node.

So with that in mind I came up with this:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class linklist {
public:
    linklist();

    void print();
    void add(int number);

private:
    struct node {
        int data;
        node *link;
    };
    void print_num(node *p);
    node* start;
};

linklist::linklist() {
    start = NULL;
}

void linklist::print() {
    print_num(start);
}

void linklist::add(int number) {
    node* temp = new node;
    temp->data = number;
    temp->link = start;
    start = temp;
}

void linklist::print_num(node *p) {
    if (p != NULL)    {   
        cout << p->data << " ";
        print_num (p->link);    
    }
}

int main() {
    linklist list;
    for (int i = 10; i > 0; i--) {
        list.add(i);
    }

    list.print();

    return 0;
}
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no at all 'cause I should use the recursion in my algorithme ... yes,the both algorithmes are true ..what I need is what should I write in the main function to apply my class ... –  epsilon_G Mar 29 '10 at 12:44
    
@epsilon_G it is what should go in your main. –  NomeN Mar 29 '10 at 13:58

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