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I can see a number of other good answers to questions relating to CSS best-practices on stack overflow:

But I think I have a different problem.

I'm trying to "re-skin" an existing site that has been nicely built using div's and ul's, etc, and it has a good existing CSS file, but when I start making changes to the CSS I quickly find that I break the layout. My feeling is that it is very hard to get a feel for how all the CSS will work together and indeed what CSS is affecting parent and sibling elements in the HTML.

So, my question is "what are the best-practices around re-skinning an existing web-site by replacing the CSS only and not modifying the existing HTML?" I can't change the classes, ids, node hierarchy, etc.

An example of the particular site that I am trying to re-skin is http://demo.nopcommerce.com/.

The existing CSS can be as complicated/detailed as this extract from the main CSS file:

.header-selectors-wrapper
{
    text-align: right;
    float: right;
    width: 500px;
}

.header-currencyselector
{
    float: right;
}

.header-languageselector
{
    float: left;
}

.header-taxDisplayTypeSelector
{
    float: right;
}

.header-links-wrapper
{
    float: right;
    text-align: right;
    width: 570px;
}

.header-links
{
    border: solid 1px #9a9a9a;
    padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px;
    margin-bottom: 5px;
    display: inline-table;
}

.order-summary-content .cart .cart-item-row td, .wishlist-content .cart .cart-item-row td
{
    border-bottom: 1px solid #c5c5c5;
    vertical-align: middle;
    line-height: 30px;
}

.order-summary-content .cart .cart-item-row td.product, .wishlist-content .cart .cart-item-row td.product
{
    text-align: left;
    padding: 0px 10px 0px 10px;
}

.order-summary-content .cart .cart-item-row td.product a, .wishlist-content .cart .cart-item-row td.product a
{
    font-weight: bold;
}

Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
This may be a stupid question, but have you seen csszengarden.com ? –  R0MANARMY Mar 29 '10 at 4:17
    
@R0MANARMY - Yes, I have. I understand that CSS Zen Garden shows the result of applying CSS-only changes to totally lay out an existing site - very much what I need to do - but it doesn't explain how to go about doing it. Or am wrong? –  Enigmativity Mar 29 '10 at 6:37
    
I didn't see guidelines or anything, no. Just figured I'd point it out in case you haven't seen it so you could look around at the submissions and as a frame of reference about how other approached the problem. –  R0MANARMY Mar 29 '10 at 18:11
    
@R0MANARMY - Thanks. Much appreciated. –  Enigmativity Mar 29 '10 at 20:28
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

crimson_penguin and Jon P have both suggested good tools to use, so I'll throw a bit of general advice in for you.

Here's what I'd do in your situation, although it's by no means THE solution.

First of all, know how you'd like the end product to look. Get a design ready so you know from the beginning where you want to end up. Don't skimp on any details either, "The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in battle"

Secondly, get familiar with the current CSS as you'll be getting very intimate with it soon. Re-order everything if you feel it necessary to something you're more comfortable with, perhaps by grouping things together that act on particular hierarchies.

For example:

#navigation {....}
   #navigation #left {....}
     #navigation #left h1 {....}
     #navigation #left p {....}
   #navigation #right {....}

Once you have a design and know the current code, start making some changes. Start with simple, low-level elements first such as a block of text or an image. Then you can build up around these. As the two previous posters mentioned, Firebug (for Firefox) and the DOM-Inspector (for Safari/Chrome) can be very helpful as you can try things out on the page without committing to anything until after you've seen how it looks.

It's a long and potentially stressful process, but with a bit of patience and perseverance you'll get there in no time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggested answer. If I can continue the war metaphor - I'm looking for the right battle strategy and if I know that strategy then I can train and arrange the troops appropriately. So is there a strategy or is the right approach just learnt thru blood, sweat and tears? –  Enigmativity Mar 29 '10 at 6:34
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If I were doing this, I would be using WebKit's DOM-inspector extensively (available in Safari or Chrome by right-clicking on a page and selecting Inspect Element). I expect it would help a lot with both wrapping your mind around the node/class/id structure, as well as helping to debug the new css as you're writing it.

It's much more convenient than just looking at the source, because it's in tree view, and nodes are collapsed by default. And it has some very useful features for inspecting the metrics (width/height/padding/border/margin) of nodes, as well as showing what style applies to them, in what order, and the final style being used.

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Please see my comment on stackoverflow.com/questions/2535742/… re Firebug. –  Enigmativity Mar 29 '10 at 6:30
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I would suggest using the Firebug plug in for Firefox. You can use this to preview changes to the CSS by editing the existing CSS while viewing the page in the broweser without making permanent changes to the CSS file. YOu will alos get an idea of the "Cascade" of styles etc.

A very handy tool aswell for javascript debugging.

share|improve this answer
    
I have been using Firebug and while it helps it, it isn't a best-practice - it's just a tool. I'm looking for a more prescriptive solution. Thanks. –  Enigmativity Mar 29 '10 at 6:29
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