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Given

class ValidationRule:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        # code here

Is there a way that I can define __init__ such that if I were to initialize the class with something like ValidationRule(other='email') then self.other would be "added" to class without having to explicitly name every possible kwarg?

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Is there a reason you're not using new-style classes? –  Georg Schölly Mar 29 '10 at 5:28
    
@Georg: I don't even know what new-style classes are? I'm using Python 2.5 if that's relevant. –  Mark Mar 29 '10 at 5:30
3  
To create a newstyle class you just need to inherit from a newstyle class (usually object) so use class ValidationRule(object): More info here: python.org/doc/newstyle –  gnibbler Mar 29 '10 at 6:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This may not be the cleanest way, but it works:

class ValidationRule: 
    def __init__(self, **kwargs): 
        self.__dict__.update(kwargs)

I think I prefer ony's solution because it restricts available properties to keep you out of trouble when your input comes from external sources.

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It won't work correctly if variable is a "magic" one. Consider propeties and slotted objects. That applies to both Python 2 and Python 3. –  WGH Sep 7 '13 at 11:55

I think somewhere on the stackoverflow I've seen such solution Anyway it can look like:

class ValidationRule:
    __allowed = ("other", "same", "different")
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        for k, v in kwargs.iteritems():
            assert( k in self.__class__.__allowed )
            setattr(self, k, v)
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ValidationRule is just my base class, and it doesn't have any of its own attributes, so there isn't anything they can accidentally overwrite, but otherwise, this would be a good safe guard ;) I'd probably use a blacklist instead of a whitelist in this case though, so as not to restrict them too much. –  Mark Mar 29 '10 at 5:40

You could do something like this:

class ValidationRule:
   def __init__(self, **kwargs):
      for (k, v) in kwargs.items():
         setattr(self, k, v)
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Very cool! Exactly what I was looking for. –  Mark Mar 29 '10 at 5:34
2  
If the kwargs list is long, you might want to use iteritems() instead of items(). For your purpose that should be fine though. –  Georg Schölly Mar 29 '10 at 10:25
class ValidationRule:
   def __init__(self, **kwargs):
      self.__dict__.update(kwargs)
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You can set your kwargs arguments by updating __dict__ attribute of the instance.

class ValidationRule:
   def __init__(self, **kwargs):
       self.__dict__.update(kwargs)
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I found the above answers helpful and then refined:

class MyObj(object):
    def __init__(self, key1=1, key2=2, key3=3):
        for (k, v) in locals().iteritems():
            if k != 'self':
                setattr(self, k, v)

Test:

>>> myobj = MyObj(key1=0)
>>> print myobj.key1
0

And validation is also there:

>>> myobj = MyObj(key4=4)
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'key4'
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