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I have some code that loops through the columns of a recordset, rs. The code seems to work identically if I include rs.MoveFirst or not.

Is .MoveFirst implicitly included if you don't explicitly include it, or is there a subtle difference I'm missing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From MSDN:

When you open a Recordset, the first record is current and the BOF property is False. If the Recordset contains no records, the BOF property is True, and there is no current record.

If the first or last record is already current when you use MoveFirst or MoveLast, the current record doesn't change.

Based on this, you can see that MoveFirst would be redundant in the scenario where you have non-zero number of records in your RecordSet.

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IMVHO, there is little to no significant difference in using the .MoveFirst method. When opening the Recordset, the Compiler tries to load the whole recordset, however on a large dataset, it would only load the minimum records, during the process it will load the complete set. However will default the "cursor" (per se) to the First record, does not matter how far the records have been returned.

The difference in performance will only occur when you travel to the last record using .MoveLast and then go back to the first record using .MoveFirst. This will then have to load all records and then travel back, this is when you will hit performance.

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I don't think the compiler tries to load anything. DAO/ADO will load records, and at that, it depends on the sort of cursor you specified when opening your recordset. If you have Snapshot then all the records will load, if you open your recordset with a dynamic cursor then only the current record will load. –  Brad Aug 18 '14 at 19:29

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