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I know this is very similar to a few other questions, but I can't quite get this function to work correctly.

def flatten(*args):
    return list(item for iterable in args for item in iterable)

The output I'm looking for is:

flatten(1) -> [1]
flatten(1,[2]) -> [1, 2]
flatten([1,[2]]) -> [1, 2]

The current function, which I took from another SO answer, doesn't seem to produce correct results at all:

>>> flatten([1,[2]])
[1, [2]]
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1  
Post your solution as an answer, and accept that one. Keeps the site cleaner :) –  Powertieke Mar 29 '10 at 6:57
    
I updated my answer, too - your self-found answer was a little neater. ;) –  Pieter Witvoet Mar 29 '10 at 6:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For a quick solution, just take your second function and make it recursive.

def flatten(*args):
    output = []
    for arg in args:
        if hasattr(arg, '__iter__'):
            output.extend(flatten(*arg))
        else:
            output.append(arg)
    return output
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test for iter doesn't work for hashes, so: –  Denis Barmenkov Aug 4 '11 at 5:31
    
Sample for strange dictionary results: >>> def flatten(*args): ... output = [] ... for arg in args: ... if hasattr(arg, 'iter'): ... output.extend(flatten(*arg)) ... else: ... output.append(arg) ... return output ... >>> adict = {1:2, 3:4, 5:6} >>> blist = ['a', 'b', 'c'] >>> raw = [adict, blist] >>> flatten(raw) [1, 3, 5, 'a', 'b', 'c'] –  Denis Barmenkov Aug 4 '11 at 5:39
    
Iterating over a dictionary yields it's keys. Since the original question didn't say anything about the desired output for dictionaries, why is this output strange? –  Pieter Witvoet Aug 9 '11 at 21:16
    
Some data will be lost :). –  Denis Barmenkov Aug 16 '11 at 14:01

If you want to flatten arbitrarily nested lists you need a recursive function:

def flatten(ls):
  if isinstance(ls, list):
     return [fa for a in ls for fa in flatten(a)]
  else:
     return [ls]

(If you expect to flatten big structures this could be made more efficient by using generators instead of returning lists.)

This function can also be reused to create a function that takes multiple parameters:

def pflatten(*ls):
   return flatten(list(ls))
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The input argument should be *ls. That does make a difference, doesn't it? And hasattr(a, '__iter__') is slightly more versatile than isinstance isn't it? –  Mark Mar 30 '10 at 1:22
    
@Mark: Currently the function takes one argument, and if it's a list, it flattens it. It could also be done with *ls, so that the function takes several parameters and creates a flat list of their concatenations. What interface you prefer is just a matter of taste, I'd say. Similar for isinstance(a, list) vs. hasattr(a, '__iter__'): It just depends what kind of result you want when you give it a list of lists of sets. A list of sets or a list of all the elements in all the sets? Depending on your requirements one or the other would be preferable. –  sth Mar 30 '10 at 1:37
    
Well yes, but this question was specifically about the latter (*ls). I see your point about sets though... not planning on using those, but tuples should definitely be converted to a flat list. –  Mark Mar 30 '10 at 1:52
    
@Mark: Oops, you are of course right, the question is about *ls... I edited a little additional function into my answer to cover that case :). To also cover tuples, probably the easiest way would be to add or isinstance(ls, tuple) to the check in flatten(). –  sth Mar 30 '10 at 2:34
    
Your pflatten doesn't work. Did you try it? I get pflatten(1,[2]) -> [(1, [2])] which is the sort of problem I was having when I posted this Q. Don't worry about it tho..... my solution does seem to work ;) –  Mark Mar 31 '10 at 3:31

Checking __iter__ presence can be quite strange when flattening dictionary:

>>> def flatten(*args):
...     output = []
...     for arg in args:
...         if hasattr(arg, '__iter__'):
...             output.extend(flatten(*arg))
...         else:
...             output.append(arg)
...     return output
...
>>> adict = {1:2, 3:4, 5:6}
>>> blist = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> raw = [adict, blist]
>>> flatten(raw)
[1, 3, 5, 'a', 'b', 'c']

I think flatten should work for lists and tuples only:

import types

def flatten(*args):
    output = []
    for arg in args:
        if isinstance(arg, (types.ListType, types.TupleType)):
            output.extend(flatten(*list(arg)))
        else:
            output.append(arg)
    return output

adict = {1:2, 3:4, 5:6}
blist = ['a', 'b', 'c']
raw = [adict, blist]
print flatten(raw)
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Solved it...

def flatlist(*args):
    lst = []
    for a in args:
        if hasattr(a, '__iter__'): lst.extend(flatlist(*a))
        else: lst.append(a)
    return lst
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