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I have this code that starts a process, expects some startup output, and then logs the rest to a file:

proc foo { } {
    set log_fp [open "somefile" a]

    exec cp $prog "$prog.elf"

    spawn someprog
    set someprog_spawn_id $spawn_id

    # do some things here that that wait for output from someprog
    expect {
        -i $someprog_spawn_id
        -re "Some output indicating successful startup"
    }

    # send the process into the background
    expect_background {
        -i $someprog_spawn_id
        full_buffer { }
        eof {
            wait -i $someprog_spawn_id
            close $log_fp 
        }
        -re {^.*\n} {
            puts $log_fp $expect_out(buffer)
        }
    }
}

Unfortunately, this errors with the message:

can't read "log_fp": no such variable

How can I access this variable within this scope?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The expect_background callback scripts are evaluated in the global scope (because the procedure may well have finished at the point when they fire) so you have to put the variable in that scope as well…

proc foo { } {
    global log_fp
    set log_fp [open "somefile" a]
    # ...

Alternatively, with 8.5 you can do some tricks with using apply to make a binding

expect_background "
    -i \$someprog_spawn_id
    full_buffer { }
    [list eof [list apply {log_fp {
        wait -i $someprog_spawn_id
        close $log_fp 
    }} $log_fp]]
    [list -re {^.*\n} [list apply {log_fp {
        puts $log_fp $expect_out(buffer)
    }} $log_fp]]
"

Really ugly though. Using a global variable is a lot easier.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't have to be that ugly, since expect can take more than one arg. I won't attempt to rewrite that in a comment though. – glenn jackman Aug 18 '14 at 12:22

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