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I just noticed that my VPS is running on very high recources. At the moment it's running at 100% for over 2 weeks already.

When I look at the processes, with the command # top I get this list (top 3).

top - 14:45:52 up 93 days, 22:05,  1 user,  load average: 1.89, 1.64, 1.57
Tasks: 138 total,   2 running, 136 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
Cpu(s): 63.7%us, 35.0%sy,  0.0%ni,  0.0%id,  0.0%wa,  0.0%hi,  1.3%si,  0.0%st
Mem:   1020400k total,   736016k used,   284384k free,   116344k buffers
Swap:  2064376k total,   175280k used,  1889096k free,   204212k cached

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
13848 myself    20   0  376m 4104 3936 R 48.1  0.4  16502:27 php
13839 root      20   0  169m 1984 1900 S 35.8  0.2  11856:37 crond
 2626 myself    20   0  373m  13m 7796 S 16.2  1.4   0:17.31 php

The other precesses all run on low recources or just for a couple of seconds. But you can see that the first two processes take up 48% and 35% and both are running for a long time! Is there any way to get a better look at the running process?

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Why should my question be closed? Please explain so I might form my question in a better way for future questions. –  Timo002 Aug 18 at 13:18
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this is a site for programming-related questions, not enviornment/troubleshooting questions. Try asking it on unix.stackexchange.com instead. –  ashes999 Aug 18 at 13:41
    
@ashes999, thnx! I will do that the next time! –  Timo002 Aug 18 at 13:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Maybe I needed to search harder on the internet. But I found out how to find the file behind the PID. So posting this as an answer although my question isn't really wanted...\

The following command gave me the process information.

# ps -f PID -f

Result:

UID        PID  PPID  C STIME TTY          TIME CMD
10000    13848 13839 54 Jul28 ?        11-11:26:43 /usr/bin/php -q /var/www/vhosts/user/folder/cron/file.php
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