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Here is my HTML:

                    <li>
                        <div class="menu_inner">
                            <a href="#">
                                <div class="button"><img class="486" src="images/portalbutton.png" /></div>
                                <div class="prod_description">&nbsp;</div>
                            </a>
                        </div>
                    </li>

I want to add a .click() function to .prod_description, the click event should take the background colour applied in CSS from the li element.

Using this code:

$(".prod_description").mousedown(function() {
    $('#toolbar').css('background-color', $(this).parent().css('background-color'))
})

I dont seem to be able to get the correct $(this).parent() combination....

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do that like this:

$(".prod_description").mousedown(function() {
    $('#toolbar').css('background-color', $(this).closest('li').css('background-color'))
});

.parent() gets the immediate parent, you want to go up a few levels (<a>, <div>, <li>). .closest('li') climbs the parents and gets the first one that's an <li>. In this case, .parent('li') would also work :)

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A quick profiling in some of my code implies .parents('li') is faster than .closest('li'), could someone confirm/disprove this? (Assuming you only have one parent li, of course.) –  David Andersson Mar 29 '10 at 10:09
1  
@David - .parents() has different behavior all-together, it goes to the root of the DOM grabbing all parents, then matches the selector against that set. It can be faster (depending how far away the .closest() match is), however .parents() gets slower and slower the deeper your element is nested, so it's only faster for a "shallow" DOM I guess is the way to describe it. But to be equivalent, you'd have to further filter: .parents('li:first'), and even that's not equivalent if you're already on what you're looking for, which .parent() and .parents() won't find. –  Nick Craver Mar 29 '10 at 10:48

In javascript, you must use backgroundColor, not background-color.

Update: As it turns out, jQuery is able to handle both formats, and even the DOM API itself let you do something like this: obj.style.setProperty('background-color', 'red');

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1  
He is using the jQuery css ( api.jquery.com/css ) function which takes a parameter that is the actual name of the CSS property. –  TommyA Mar 29 '10 at 10:09
    
Thanks for info, never realized jQuery is able to translate it. –  jholster Mar 29 '10 at 10:48

Use click event instead of mousedown. Use closest to get the li element

$("div.prod_description").click(function() {
    $('#toolbar').css('background-color', $(this).closest('li').css('background-color'))
});

I have used a tag selector also in the click event. If you can give the background color in a CSS class, then you can use something like this

li.mybg { background-color: #a9a9a9; }

<li class="mybg">
   <div class="menu_inner">
      <a href="#">
         <div class="button">
             <img class="486" src="images/portalbutton.png" />
         </div>
         <div class="prod_description">&nbsp;</div>
      </a>
   </div>
 </li>

$("div.prod_description").click(function() {
    $('#toolbar').addClass('mybg');
});
share|improve this answer
    
I also first recommended using click(), until I realized click() fires after releasing mouse button (AFAIK), which may not be the desired behavior in this case. –  jholster Mar 29 '10 at 10:01

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