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I've been playing around with System.Drawing and I've got it working the way that I wanted it to except for one thing. When I release the mouse button, the line disappears.

How do I ensure the line remains exactly where I left it?

using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace DrawingSample
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            this.DoubleBuffered = true;
        }

        Graphics graphics;

        Random
            color = new Random(1);
        Int32
            penThickness = 1;
        Point
            currentCursorLocation, initialTouchLocation, touchOffset;
        Boolean
            mouseDown;

        protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
        {
            graphics = e.Graphics;

            if (mouseDown)
            {
                graphics.SmoothingMode = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.SmoothingMode.HighQuality;

                //DrawRectangle(graphics);
                //DrawEllipse(graphics);

                DrawLine(graphics);
            }
        }

        private void DrawRectangle(Graphics graphics)
        {
            graphics.DrawRectangle(new Pen(
                Color.FromArgb((color.Next(1, 
                255)), 
                (color.Next(1, 
                255)), 
                (color.Next(1, 
                255)))
                , 
                penThickness),
                currentCursorLocation.X,
                currentCursorLocation.Y,
                (this.Width / 2),
                (this.Height / 2)
                );
        }

        private void DrawEllipse(Graphics graphics)
        {
            graphics.DrawEllipse(new Pen(
                Color.FromArgb((color.Next(1, 255)),
                (color.Next(1, 255)),
                (color.Next(1, 255))), penThickness), 
                new RectangleF(currentCursorLocation, new Size(100, 100)));
        }

        private void DrawLine(Graphics graphics)
        {
            graphics.DrawLine(new Pen(
                Color.FromArgb((color.Next(1, 255)), 
                (color.Next(1, 255)), 
                (color.Next(1, 255))), penThickness),
                currentCursorLocation.X,
                currentCursorLocation.Y,
                touchOffset.X,
                touchOffset.Y
                );
        }

        private void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            currentCursorLocation = e.Location;
            this.Refresh();
        }

        private void Form1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            if (!mouseDown)
            {
                touchOffset = e.Location;
                mouseDown = true;
            }
        }

        private void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            mouseDown = false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You're asking the code to behave like that. So it does the same thing.

You set mouseDown to false in Form1_MouseUp event.

private void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    mouseDown = false; //<--Here
}

Then you are checking if (mouseDown) before painting the line.

protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
{
    graphics = e.Graphics;

    if (mouseDown)//<--Here
    {
        graphics.SmoothingMode = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.SmoothingMode.HighQuality;

        //DrawRectangle(graphics);
        //DrawEllipse(graphics);

        DrawLine(graphics);
    }
}

I guess you don't need if (mouseDown) check in OnPaint method.

Not sure what your intention is, If you need more help drop a comment below the answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Sriram, this has answered my question. My intention is to be able to drag the line around and when I release the button, leave the line there as it was drawn. –  jay_t55 Aug 19 '14 at 9:08
    
@Aeron See if my related answer helps. You just declare points as Nullable<T> check whether nullable.HasValue and draw it. You don't need if (mouseDown) check. –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 19 '14 at 9:09

You probably want to keep a list of all drawn lines in a separate field to be able to redraw them when necessary. In other words, if you define a class like this:

class Line
{
    public Point Start { get; set; }
    public Point End { get; set; }
}

This allows you to have both a list of already drawn lines, and the currently drawn line (while mouse is held down):

// this is the line currently being drawn (i.e. a temporary line)
private Line _currentLine = null;

// this is the list of all finished lines
private readonly List<Line> _lines = new List<Line>();

Mouse handlers are now straightforward:

protected override void OnMouseDown(MouseEventArgs e)
{
    // when button is pressed, create a new _currentLine instance

    _currentLine = new Line() { Start = e.Location, End = e.Location };
    Invalidate();
    base.OnMouseDown(e);
}

protected override void OnMouseMove(MouseEventArgs e)
{
    // when mouse is moved, update the End position

    if (_currentLine != null)
    {
        _currentLine.End = e.Location;
        Invalidate();
    }
    base.OnMouseMove(e);
}

protected override void OnMouseUp(MouseEventArgs e)
{
    // when button is released, add the line to the list

    if (_currentLine != null)
    {
        _lines.Add(_currentLine);
        _currentLine = null;
        Invalidate();
    }
    base.OnMouseUp(e);
}

And the OnPaint method would look something like this:

protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
{
    // if you want smoother (anti-aliased) graphics, set these props
    e.Graphics.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.HighQuality;
    e.Graphics.InterpolationMode = InterpolationMode.HighQualityBicubic;

    // draw all existing lines from the list
    using (var p = new Pen(Color.Black, 2f))
        foreach (var line in _lines)
            e.Graphics.DrawLine(p, line.Start, line.End);

    // if mouse is down, draw the dashed line also
    if (_currentLine != null)
        using (var p = new Pen(Color.Salmon, 2f))
        {
            p.DashStyle = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.DashStyle.Dot;
            e.Graphics.DrawLine(p, _currentLine.Start, _currentLine.End);
        }

    base.OnPaint(e);
}

Also, there is much less flickering if you use the Form.SetStyles method in the constructor to indicate that you'll be doing all painting yourself and don't want Windows to clear the form by itself. This means that your Form's constructor should look something like:

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    SetStyle(
       ControlStyles.AllPaintingInWmPaint | 
       ControlStyles.OptimizedDoubleBuffer | 
       ControlStyles.ResizeRedraw | 
       ControlStyles.UserPaint,
       true);
}

Keeping the list of lines is much better than simply drawing them onto the surface, because it allows you to:

  1. Keep the data format as vectors, instead of as a bitmap (allows high-res scaling),
  2. Add editing functionality (i.e. select an existing line, move it, change its color, and similar stuff).
share|improve this answer
1  
Also, extending this to draw different types of geometric objects is a common exercise in OOP: you would have a base Shape class (or an IShape interface), which would expose its Draw(Graphics g) method and draw itself. This means there would be a list of shapes and a current shape instead of a line, and you would probably choose the shape type from a menu. –  Groo Aug 19 '14 at 10:13

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