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Yesterday in my interview I was asked this question. (At that time I was highly pressurized by so many abrupt questions).

int *p;
*p=23;
printf("%d",*p);

Is there any problem with this code?

I explained him that you are trying to assign value to a pointer to whom memory is not allocated.

But the way he reacted, it was like I am wrong. Although I got the job but after that he said Mohit think about this question again. I don't know what he was trying to say. Please let me know is there any problem in my answer?

EDIT I added the code on the sheet;-

int *p;
p=malloc(sizeof(int));
*p=23;
printf("%d",*p);      

This must be the perfect code...Am i right..

EDIT2

int *p;
*p=23;
 OR
int *p=23;

I think both has problem. Cause some body is saying about the title of the post.

share|improve this question
3  
Good question. And the interviewer is right to ask such questions. They clearly show what one's "five years of C development" are worth. – sharptooth Mar 29 '10 at 13:31
4  
Please note your question title and your question text are semantically different. – anon Mar 29 '10 at 13:34
    
Fixed the title to what was (I think) intended – Yacoby Mar 29 '10 at 13:47
1  
We were saying that int *p; *p=23; is radically different from int *p=23;. Both have problems, but different ones. Also, the code that you say in edit one to be "perfect" still suffers from undefined behaviour, in the line *p=23;, so it is perfect for crashing, if anything. – Daniel Daranas Mar 29 '10 at 15:57
    
what reason did the interviewer give for this not being correct? (I would have accepted your answer as correct / understanding the failure of the code) – KevinDTimm Oct 14 '10 at 13:05
up vote 26 down vote accepted

"trying to assign value to a pointer to whom memory is not allocated"

I think you just misphrased it a bit. You're not trying to assign a value to a pointer, you're trying to assign a value to the referand of a pointer.

Since the pointer is uninitialised, this is, as you say, undefined behaviour. The pointer doesn't refer to anything (at least not validly - as other answers point out, the bits of storage of p might just so happen to contain a value which is the address of some memory location, and your code might overwrite that. The standard permits anything to happen with UB, but knowing something about your implementation you can often take a shrewd guess).

So probably in the interviewer's mind you have the right idea, but it's valuable to have it exactly straight in your mind and in your speech what the difference is between a finger and the moon, and which one you're talking about.

share|improve this answer
    
yaa i explained him in a proper way that its a undefined behavior cause pointer doesnt have any memory and without allocating memory u r assign value to the un initialized memory. I just want to confirm the logic was correct na.. Or my ansswer os completely wrong. – Mohit Jain Mar 29 '10 at 13:27
13  
No, you're not "assigning a value to uninitialized memory" either. If I give you an envelope to deliver, and the address (pointer value) is smudged (uninitialised), then you can't deliver it. You aren't trying to deliver it to a smudged house, though, you're trying to figure out what house a smudged envelope refers to. It doesn't refer to any house, so you can take the rest of the afternoon off (undefined behavior). – Steve Jessop Mar 29 '10 at 13:31
3  
So for instance if I write char c; char *p = &c; *p = 'X';, then I'm assigning a value ('X') to uninitialised memory (the variable c). Nothing wrong with that. – Steve Jessop Mar 29 '10 at 13:36

p is not initialized - it stores some address. Dereferencing it is undefined behavior.

The address stored in p may be mapped into the address space of the process or may be not mapped. If it is mapped some unrelated (but maybe important for the program) data is stored at that address. So either your program crashes immediately because of memory protection or you change some data belonging to the program. The consequences of the latter may vary - maybe nothing happens, maybe you don't notice, maybe you corrupt important data and the program breaks apart - classic undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer

'p' is pointing to an unknown location, and not to a "not allocated" memory.

The difference is that since it's undefined, it could point to an allocated memory, even if this memory wasn't meant to be accessed by this function.

share|improve this answer

int *p=23;

This is completely different. Here you're declaring a pointer, and assigning it a value of 23. Meaning it now points to the memory location 23, which may or may not contain readable data.

But simply assigning an arbitrary value to a pointer without dereferencing it is perfectly safe.

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(char** argv) {
  // THIS POINTER IS NOT DECLARED (SO IT'S NOT USABLE/INVALID)
  int *p;
  // 1) SO RESERVE MEMORY AND SET POINTER TO VALID MEMORY...
  p=malloc(sizeof(int));
  // 2) ...CHECK IF ALLOCATION WAS OK...
  if (p) {
    *p=23;
    printf("%d",*p);
  } else printf("sorry, no memory");
  // 3) ...AND FINALLY DE-ALLOCATE MEMORY (FREEING IS IGNORED WHEN p IS NULL)!
  free(p);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
And check the return value of malloc for null. – Steve Jessop Mar 29 '10 at 14:13
1  
I think *p=23; should happen after allocation check was performed. – Brian Mar 29 '10 at 14:37
    
Don't call free() unless the malloc() succeeded, either. That call should immediately follow the printf(), inside the if. – Steve Madsen Mar 29 '10 at 15:27
    
@Steve: Calling free() with parameter NULL is ok and allowed. So this ensures memory de-allocation in every case. This is helpful for complex switches and eases overview (ok, this example is quite simple). – Achim Tromm Mar 29 '10 at 15:47

int *p;

initailly the above pointer contains some garbage value( invalid adress value or un allocated address ).

*p = 23;

then your are trying to put some value (23) in the invalid memory leads to undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer

Apart from the fact that the example doesn't allocate memory for the value 23, it also won't compile in the first place because you've got two characters in your characted constant (which is meant to be a string). Eg, replace '%d' with "%d" in the printf-statement.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jasper Bekkers Yupp. – Mohit Jain Mar 29 '10 at 14:31

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