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can any one tell me regular expression for postalcode of Amsterdam, Netherlands for validation EX. 1113 GJ

Postal code format according to Wikipedia (thanks to Pekka):

1011–1199 plus a literal suffix AA-ZZ, e.g. 1012 PP

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2  
Can you provide a couple of example Amsterdam, NL postcodes? –  Andy Shellam Mar 29 '10 at 13:52
3  
According to Wikipedia 1011–1199 plus a literal suffix AA-ZZ, e.g. 1012 PP. @rajanikant you could at least put that little effort into your question and look it up yourself. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '10 at 13:54
    
example of nl postalcode is 1113 GJ –  rajanikant Mar 29 '10 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

^(11[0-9]{2}|10[2-9][0-9]|101[1-9])\s*[A-Z]{2}$

will match numbers from 1011-1199, followed by two letters from A to Z.

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Edit after the Wikipedia definition was posted (nice one Pekka :) ):

1[0-1][0-9]{2} [A-Z]{2}
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1  
Matches some illegal numbers (like 1000). –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 29 '10 at 14:33
    
Well spotted :) . –  Daniel Mar 29 '10 at 22:11

Try:

^(11[0-9]{2}|10[1-9]{2}|10[2-9]0)\s*([A-Z]{2}|[a-z]{2})

As the postalcode range of Amsterdam is from 1011, using 1[0-1][0-9]{2} will also cause the 1000 code to match. In this example the range 1000 - 1010 will not be matched.

This bit matches 1100 - 1199:

(^11[0-9]{2})

This bit matches 1011 - 1099, but does not match 1020, 1030, 1040 and so on:

(^10[1-9]{2})

This bit matches 1020 - 1090, in steps of 10, matching 1020,1030,1040 and so on:

(^10[2-9]0)
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i dont get why i got a -1 :S –  lugte098 Mar 30 '10 at 8:23

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