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What is the best way to refresh a DataGridView when you update the base data source?

I'm updating the datasource frequently and wanted to display the outcome to the user as it happens.

I've got something like this made (and it works), but null'ing out the DataGridView.DataSource doesn't seem like the right way.

List<ItemState> itemStates = new List<ItemState>();
dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { 
    itemStates.Add(new ItemState { Id = i.ToString() });
    dataGridView1.DataSource = null;
    dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Well, it doesn't get much better than that. Officially, you should use

dataGridView1.DataSource = typeof(List); 
dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;

It's still a "clear/reset source" kind of solution, but I have yet to find anything else that would reliably refresh the DGV data source.

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This is the way I have been doing it for a long time and it seems to work the best. It causes all of your data bound controls to check to see if their data has been updated and then refresh if necessary. –  John Chuckran Oct 31 '08 at 15:43
    
cheers for validating that. i was hoping you could just change the datasource then perform a refresh of some kind. :P it just seemed like a logical solution. oh well –  shaunf Oct 31 '08 at 16:05
    
What's the significance of using 'typeof(List)' instead of null? –  GWLlosa Jul 10 '09 at 19:04
4  
@GWLlosa, if you are using auto generated columns and you set the datasource to NULL it will clear the columns. By using typeof(List) it should maintain the column structure during the refresh. I would personally use AutoGenerateColumns = false; and create the columns on the first pass of the refresh. That way if the user resizes a column it won't toss out their change on refresh. –  Chris Porter Jul 13 '09 at 12:01
2  
@Alan Why not use a BindingSource and then you can refresh on that which is so clean and tidy as opposed to re-binding as it were? –  CodeBlend Sep 20 '11 at 21:46

I ran into this myself. My recommendation: If you have ownership of the datasource, don't use a List. Use a BindingList. The BindingList has events that fire when items are added or changed, and the DataGridView will automatically update itself when these events are fired.

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4  
This is a good suggestion. After that you just have to call .Refresh() for the datagridview to refresh it's data displayed... –  veljkoz Apr 29 '10 at 17:08
2  
Just ran into this same problem. The suggestion of using BindingList works very nicely. –  MRAB Oct 8 '11 at 3:32
2  
can refresh row by row using: bindingList.ResetItem(bindingList.IndexOf(item)); –  Adam Butler Nov 23 '11 at 3:25
    
.Refresh() just talks about the control redrawing, nothing to do with bindings unless I am very much mistaken! "Forces the control to invalidate its client area and immediately redraw itself and any child controls." Control.Refresh Method –  CodeBlend Jan 24 '13 at 12:39

This is copy my answer from THIS place.

Only need to fill datagrid again like this:

this.XXXTableAdapter.Fill(this.DataSet.XXX);

If you use automaticlly connect from dataGridView this code create automaticlly in Form_Load()

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Observablecollection :Represents a dynamic data collection that provides notifications when items get added, removed, or when the whole list is refreshed. You can enumerate over any collection that implements the IEnumerable interface. However, to set up dynamic bindings so that insertions or deletions in the collection update the UI automatically, the collection must implement the INotifyCollectionChanged interface. This interface exposes the CollectionChanged event, an event that should be raised whenever the underlying collection changes.

Observablecollection<ItemState> itemStates = new Observablecollection<ItemState>();

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { 
    itemStates.Add(new ItemState { Id = i.ToString() });
  }
 dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;
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You are setting the datasource inside of the loop and sleeping 500 after each add. Why not just add to itemstates and then set your datasource AFTER you have added everything. If you want the thread sleep after that fine. The first block of code here is yours the second block I modified.

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { 
    itemStates.Add(new ItemState { Id = i.ToString() });
    dataGridView1.DataSource = null;
    dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
}

Change your Code As follows: this is much faster.

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { 
    itemStates.Add(new ItemState { Id = i.ToString() });

}
    dataGridView1.DataSource = typeof(List); 
    dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
share|improve this answer

Try this Code

List itemStates = new List();

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{ 
    itemStates.Add(new ItemState { Id = i.ToString() });
    dataGridView1.DataSource = itemStates;
    dataGridView1.DataBind();
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
}
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3  
DataBind() is an ASP .Net method for databound controls. –  Tjaart Dec 2 '11 at 10:33
2  
+ Thread.Sleep!!! =( –  CodeBlend Jan 24 '13 at 12:41

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