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I have a class that holds the name of a file, and the data of a file:

public class FileMeta
{
    public string FileName { get; set; }
    public byte[] FileData { get; set; }
}

I have a method that populates a collection of this class through an async download operation (Files are not coming from a local file system):

async Task<List<FileMeta>> ReturnFileData(IEnumerable<string> urls)
{
    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
        var results = await Task.WhenAll(urls.Select(async url => new
        {
            FileName = Path.GetFileName(url),
            FileData = await client.GetByteArrayAsync(url),
        }));
        return results.Select(result => 
            new FileMeta
            {
                FileName = result.FileName, 
                FileData = result.FileData
            }).ToList();
    }
}

I am going to feed this List<FileMeta> into a ZipFile creator, and the ZipFile like all File containers needs unique file names.

Readability is important, and I would like to be able to do the following:

file.txt => file.txt
file.txt => file(1).txt
file.txt => file(2).txt

There are a number of examples on how to do this within the file system, but not with a simple object collection. (Using System.IO.File.Exists for example)

What's the best way to loop through this collection of objects and return a unique set of file names?

How far I've gotten

private List<FileMeta> EnsureUniqueFileNames(IEnumerable<FileMeta> fileMetas)
{
    var returnList = new List<FileMeta>();
    foreach (var file in fileMetas)
    {
        while (DoesFileNameExist(file.FileName, returnList))
        {
             //Append (n) in sequence until match is not found?
        }
    }
    return returnList;
}

private bool DoesFileNameExist(string fileName, IEnumerable<FileMeta> fileMeta)
{
    var fileNames = fileMeta.Select(file => file.FileName).ToList();
    return fileNames.Contains(fileName);
}
share|improve this question
1  
What means "not using System.IO"? You are using System.IO.Path. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 19 '14 at 19:33
    
@TimSchmelter Good Point. I've seen a few examples that use methods tied into the file system, using things like System.IO.File.Exists that I cannot use here. I'll correct that. EDIT: Question edited to be more specific –  Wesley Aug 19 '14 at 19:34
1  
@clcto Hi again. Yes, the files being downloaded are unique in their folders, but we are accessing across folders. So if I grab files http://file.com/folder1/sample.pdf and http://file.com/folder2/sample.pdf, they are unique in their host location. But after downloading them into the FileMeta object, they are simply sample.pdf and we have a name conflict. –  Wesley Aug 19 '14 at 19:36
1  
This should not have been closed. It is a clear and complete question. Just flagged it for attention. –  Henk Holterman Aug 19 '14 at 19:42
4  
the basic technique would be string newName; do { index++; newName = string.Format("file({0}).txt", index); } while (NameIsInUse(newName)); –  phoog Aug 19 '14 at 19:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try the following to increment the filenames:

private List<FileMeta> EnsureUniqueFileNames(IEnumerable<FileMeta> fileMetas)
{
    var returnedList = new List<FileMeta>();
    foreach (var file in fileMetas)
    {
        int count = 0;
        string originalFileName = file.FileName;
        while (returnedList.Any(fileMeta => fileMeta.FileName.Equals(file.FileName, 
                                            StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        {
            string fileNameOnly = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(originalFileName);
            string extension = Path.GetExtension(file.FileName);
            file.FileName = string.Format("{0}({1}){2}", fileNameOnly, count, extension);
            count++;
        }

        returnList.Add(file);
    }
    return returnList;
}

As a side note, in your ReturnFileData, you're generating two lists, one of anonymous type and one of your actual FileMeta type. You can reduce the creation of the intermediate list. Actually, you don't need to await inside the method at all:

private Task<FileMeta[]> ReturnFileDataAsync(IEnumerable<string> urls)
{
    var client = new HttpClient();
    return Task.WhenAll(urls.Select(async url => new FileMeta
    {
        FileName = Path.GetFileName(url),
        FileData = await client.GetByteArrayAsync(url),
    }));
}

I made the return type a FileMeta[] instead of a List<FileMeta>, as it is a fixed sized returning anyway, and reduces the need to call ToList on the returned array. I also added the Async postfix, to follow the TAP guidelines.

share|improve this answer
    
That's badass. Any danger in not wrapping the HttpClient in a using statement? –  Wesley Aug 19 '14 at 20:50
1  
This is a quote from Glenn Block, currently working at Microsoft Azure (This is from Designing Evolvable Web API using ASP.NET): Although HttpClient does indirectly implement the IDisposable interface, the standard usage of HttpClient is not to dispose of it after every request. The HttpClient object is intended to live for as long as your application needs to make HTTP requests. If you see it causing any trouble down the road, you could always refactor. –  Yuval Itzchakov Aug 19 '14 at 20:56
1  
Awesome. Above and beyond, how do I give you bonus points? –  Wesley Aug 19 '14 at 20:57
    
Glad i could help :) –  Yuval Itzchakov Aug 19 '14 at 20:58

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