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I am trying to use seTimeout() to fade out and then back in a <div> element while the page is scrolling. fadeOut() works as intended but fadeIn() only ever gets to 0.1 opacity.

It seems as if the opacity of the <div> element is set to 0 constantly and when I call fade in, it only bumps it up to .1 before it is reset back to 0.. That's my theory at least and since I'm new to JS I am having issues figuring this out.

Code:

function fadeOut() {
    console.log("fade out: " + document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity)
    if(document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity > .11) {
        document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity -= .1;
        fadeDelay = setTimeout('fadeOut()',100);
    } else {
        document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity = 0;
        console.log("stopped fade out.");
    }
}

function fadeIn() {
    console.log("fade in: " + document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity)
    if(document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity < .9) {
        document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity += .1;
        fadeDelay = setTimeout('fadeIn()',100);
    } else {
        document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity = 1;
        console.log("stopped fade in.");
    }
}
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1  
Can you create a fiddle with your code demonstrating the problem? How is fadeOut and fadeIn originally called? What does the HTML look like? –  Matt Burland Aug 19 at 20:31
    
If you have jQuery, have you tried fadeToggle()? –  mjr Aug 19 at 20:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a weird and uncommon way to fade a dom element. I'd recommend you to switch your approach using requestAnimationFrame or using pure css.

In this case, using css you be the quickest, lightest and easiest way of doing things. You would then have something like this:

CSS

#quotes {
    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.5s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 0.5s ease-out;
}

JS

var quotes = document.getElementById("quotes");

function fadeIn() {
    quotes.style.opacity = 1;
}

 function fadeOut() {
    quotes.style.opacity = 0;
}

It's up to you to play with timings and curves to fit your needs.

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didn't know that was possible! thanks! –  Duck Aug 19 at 23:27

style.opacity returns a string, += contacts the string instead of increasing the value

try this

function fadeIn() {
console.log("fade in: " + document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity)
var opacity = Number(document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity)
if(document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity < 0.9) {
    document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity = opacity + 0.1;
    fadeDelay = setTimeout('fadeIn()',100);
} else {
    document.getElementById('quotes').style.opacity = 1;
    console.log("stopped fade in.");
}
}
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