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I am writing some unit tests for an extension method I have written on IPrincipal. To assist, I have created a couple of helper classes (some code for not-implemented members of the interfaces has been omitted for brevity):

public class IPrincipalStub : IPrincipal
{
    private IIdentity identityStub = new IIdentityStub();

    public IIdentity Identity
    {
        get { return identityStub; }
        set { identityStub = value; }
    }
}

public class IIdentityStub : IIdentity
{
    public string Name { get; set; } // BZZZT!!!
}

However, the Name property in the IIdentity interface is read-only (the IIDentity interface specifies a getter but not a setter for the Name property).

How can I set the Name property in my stub object for testing purposes if the interface has defined it as a read-only property?

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Constructor? i.e IIdentityStub will have a parameterized constructor that takes Name as parameter. –  shahkalpesh Mar 29 '10 at 18:05
    
Did your "BZZZT" refer to a compile error? I was able to compile your sample just fine (w/semi-colons on the Identity property, that is). –  micahtan Mar 29 '10 at 18:27
    
@micahtan: Yes, but when you try to write a test against it, and set the value of Name in the test, the compiler will complain that Name is read-only, because the Name property in IIDentity does not have a setter defined. –  Robert Harvey Mar 29 '10 at 22:35
    
I was thinking of setting IPrincipalStub.Identity to an instance of IIdentityStub that you construct (thus taking advantage of the setter) instead of using the constructor-created field. I guess it depends on what you want your setup code to look like in your unit tests. –  micahtan Mar 30 '10 at 2:29
    
@Micahtan: I wound up putting a constructor in IPrincipalStub that accepted the Name as a string, and passed it along to the IIDentityStub constructor that also accepted the name as a string. Eventually, I will be doing everything in Moq, though. –  Robert Harvey Mar 30 '10 at 3:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're using the auto-properties feature of C# but instead you should go the manual route and create a backing field for the property. Once you have a backing field you can set its value in the constructor (or make it a public field and set it after you have the object, but this is a little uglier).

public class IIdentityStub : IIdentity{
    private string _name;

    public IIdentityStub(string name){
        _name = name;
    }

    public string Name { get { return _name; } }
}
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And if the value isn't settable via the constructor, you have a problem with your design. –  JSBձոգչ Mar 29 '10 at 18:11
    
Excellent, thanks. –  Robert Harvey Mar 29 '10 at 18:21
    
@Robert Harvey: No problem sir. –  Jason Punyon Mar 29 '10 at 18:22
    
Note that "public string Name { get; private set; }" and then setting in the constructor is perfectly legal. –  TrueWill Mar 29 '10 at 21:43
    
@TrueWill: Yes, but that would not match the signature of the IIdentity interface Name property. –  Robert Harvey Mar 29 '10 at 22:34

I agree with juharr - use a mocking/isolation framework. I'd recommend Moq.

The following will print "Robert":

using System;
using System.Security.Principal;
using Moq;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            var mockIdentity = new Mock<IIdentity>();
            var mockPrincipal = new Mock<IPrincipal>();

            mockIdentity.SetupGet(x => x.Name).Returns("Robert");
            mockPrincipal.SetupGet(x => x.Identity).Returns(mockIdentity.Object);

            IPrincipal myStub = mockPrincipal.Object;

            Console.WriteLine(myStub.Identity.Name);
        }
    }
}

EDIT: But if you want to do it by hand...

using System;
using System.Security.Principal;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            IIdentity identity =
                new IdentityStub
                    {
                        Name = "Robert",
                        AuthenticationType = "Kerberos",
                        IsAuthenticated = true
                    };

            IPrincipal principal = new PrincipalStub(identity);

            Console.WriteLine(principal.Identity.Name);  // Robert
            Console.WriteLine(principal.IsInRole(PrincipalStub.ValidRole));  // True
            Console.WriteLine(principal.IsInRole("OtherRole"));  // False
        }
    }

    public class PrincipalStub : IPrincipal
    {
        public const string ValidRole = "TestRole";

        public PrincipalStub(IIdentity identity)
        {
            Identity = identity;
        }

        public IIdentity Identity { get; private set; }

        public bool IsInRole(string role)
        {
            return role == ValidRole;
        }
    }

    public class IdentityStub : IIdentity
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string AuthenticationType { get; set; }
        public bool IsAuthenticated { get; set; }
    }
}

(The above is not a unit test, just an example of hand-rolled stubs using a bit of dependency injection.)

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I recommend using a Mock library like NMock

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True, but I figured I'd better learn how to write my own stubs first. –  Robert Harvey Mar 29 '10 at 18:19

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