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I have to display a TreeView in a WinForm, based on an complex Dictionary and I'm looking for the 'shortest' method to do it. I think it can be done in one LINQ query but I don't know how and I'm not even sure if it is possible.

Here an example of the entry dictionary :

Dictionary<String, String> dict = new Dictionary<String, String>()
{
  {"aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd", "value1"},
  {"aaa.bbb.ccc.eee", "value2"},
  {"aaa.bbb.fff.ggg", "value3"},
  {"aaa.hhh.iii.jjj", "value4"},
  {"bbb.ddd", "value5"},
  {"ccc", "value6"}
};

And I want to get back a TreeView like this :

|--+ aaa
|  |--+ bbb
|  |  |--+ ccc
|  |  |  |--- ddd = value1
|  |  |  |--- eee = value2
|  |  |
|  |  |--+ fff
|  |  |  |--- ggg = value3
|  |
|  |--+ hhh
|  |  |--+ iii
|  |  |  |--- jjj = value4
|
|--+ bbb
|  |--- ddd = value5
|
|--+ ccc = value6

And here what I have got now (I don't handle the value yet) :

List<String> list = new List<string>() { 
    "aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd", 
    "aaa.bbb.ccc.eee",
    "aaa.bbb.fff.ddd",
    "aaa.bbb.fff.ggg",
    "aaa.ggg.fff.hhh",
    "hhh.iii.jjj.kkk"
};

Action<TreeNode, String> traverse = null;

traverse = (node, chaine) =>
{
    String[] tab = chaine.Split(new char[] { '.' }, 2);

    TreeNode child = null;
    if (node.Nodes.ContainsKey(tab[0]))
    {
        child = node.Nodes[tab[0]];
    }
    else
    {
        child = node.Nodes.Add(tab[0]); // + ((tab.Length > 1) ? " - " + tab[1] : ""));
        child.Name = tab[0];
    }

    if (tab.Length > 1 && !String.IsNullOrEmpty(tab[1]))
        traverse(child, tab[1]);
};

TreeNode test = this.treeView1.Nodes.Add("test");

list.ForEach(x => traverse(test, x));

I hope I'm clear enough in my explanation.

share|improve this question
2  
It would fit here better: codereview.stackexchange.com/?as=1 –  walther Aug 20 '14 at 10:47
    
I'll know for next time, thanks. –  Anonymuf Aug 21 '14 at 6:37

1 Answer 1

There is a fair bit of logic going on in your Action, so I doubt it can be done within a single LINQ query so that it would look something like

var query = from this in that where this is t select this

But what you could do is rewrite it a little bit, something like:

    public void AnotherWay()
    {
        TreeNode parent = this.treeView1.Nodes.Add("test");

        List<String> list = new List<String>() 
        { 
            "aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd", 
            "aaa.bbb.ccc.eee",
            "aaa.bbb.fff.ddd",
            "aaa.bbb.fff.ggg",
            "aaa.ggg.fff.hhh",
            "hhh.iii.jjj.kkk"
        };

        list.ForEach(x =>
            {
                TreeNode root = parent;
                TreeNode child = null;

                x.Split(new[] { '.' })
                    .ToList()
                    .ForEach(i =>
                    {
                        child = root.Nodes.ContainsKey(i) ?
                            root.Nodes[i] :
                            root.Nodes.Add(i);

                        child.Name = i;
                        root = child;
                    });
            });
    }

This code does exactly what you already posted, but is just smaller and IMO reads slightly clearer.

Generally I see an Action or Func that performs a fair bit of logic to be a code smell, especially if it is reused several times (in which case it should be extracted out into it's own method, but I digress).

In your case though it appears that the Action is only being used the once in the line list.ForEach(x => traverse(test, x)); and so the functionality can simply replace your call to the Action, as in my example above. (However, if the complexity of the logic or the LOC increased then in this example I would be tempted to move the functionality out into it's own method for maintainability).

This approach also allows you to very easily cater for your second requirement of handling dictionary's with little modification, such as:

    public void DictFunc()
    {
        TreeNode parent = this.treeView1.Nodes.Add("test");

        Dictionary<String, String> dict = new Dictionary<String, String>()
        {
            { "aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd", "Value1" },
            { "aaa.bbb.ccc.eee", "Value2" },
            { "aaa.bbb.fff.ddd", "Value3" },
            { "aaa.bbb.fff.ggg", "Value4" },
            { "aaa.ggg.fff.hhh", "Value5" },
            { "hhh.iii.jjj.kkk", "Value6" }
        };

        dict.ToList().ForEach(x =>
        {
            // For brevity, same as logic in example above.
            // Plus the small amount (~three LOC) of additional logic
            // required to handle the values.
        });
    }

I've left the dictionary value handling as an exercise for you, but the rest of the logic inside the ForEach is identical to that in my first example.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you, that was very helpfull, and that help me to understand some missing principes ;-) –  Anonymuf Aug 21 '14 at 9:25
    
To handle the value, I add this LOC 'child.Text = child.Text + " = " + x.Value;' after the inner lambda expression. Does it seems correct to you ? Do you think this feature is feasible using GroupBy on a recursive way ? –  Anonymuf Aug 21 '14 at 9:54
    
Yes, to print the value you should be setting the .Text property. However, I would suggest using a StringBuilder() instead of concatenating strings with +. Also, consider caching the split string and operating on that for the inner .ForEach. The benefit being you can then test whether the current key is the last one, so you know when to print the value e.g. split_x.ForEach(k => /* do stuff */ child.Text = split_x.Last().Equals(k) ? /* StringBuilder stuff */ : k; ); –  Carl Burnett Aug 21 '14 at 12:19

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