Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I say this

using (Entities db = new Entities())
{
    return db.TableName.AsQueryable().ToList();
}

Do I by-pass the functionality of using block since I return something, and the method exits before exiting the using block, so I think the using block will not serve to its purpose and dispose the resource.

Is this correct?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You are incorrect; it will be disposed.

The using statement compiles to a try / finally block that disposes the original object in the finally block.
finally blocks are always executed, even if the code inside the try block returned a value or threw an exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you :) I was scared that my code would be made fun of –  Snoop Dogg Mar 29 '10 at 18:28
2  
Finally block doesn't always execute ;) thedailywtf.com/Comments/My-Tales.aspx –  R0MANARMY Mar 29 '10 at 18:36
    
Uhm ok yeap. I clicked :) –  Snoop Dogg Mar 30 '10 at 9:10
add comment

using statement will call Dispose of db object before value returning.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Nope, the using block will force the firing of the Dispose object.

http://www.devx.com/dotnet/Article/33167

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02(VS.80).aspx

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your using statement will indeed succeed. It is akin to the following (which is what the C# compiler will translate the using statement into:

Entities db = new Entities();
try
{
    return db.TableName.AsQueryable().ToList();
}
finally
{
    ((IDisposable)db).Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.