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I have a code that tests if a json config file exists - if so, loads the values, if not, creates it with raw input.

import os
import json

if os.path.isfile("config.json"):
    config = open('config.json', 'r')
    confjson = json.loads(config)
    fruit = confjson['fruit']
    vegetables = confjson['vegetables']

    print "fruit:", fruit
    print "vegetables:", vegetables
else:
    fruit = raw_input("Enter your favourite fruit: ")
    vegetables = raw_input("Enter your favourite vegerables (separated by space): ")
    vegetables = vegetables.split(" ")
    config = open('config.json', 'w')
    config.write('{"fruit":"'+fruit+'","vegetables":'+str(vegetables)+'}')

The writing to file part works well:

>>> 
Enter your favourite fruit: apple
Enter your favourite vegerables (separated by space): carrot potato
>>> 

However, when I now restart the program, I get the following error:

>>> 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:/Users/dell/Desktop/test2.py", line 6, in <module>
    confjson = json.loads(config)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\json\__init__.py", line 338, in loads
    return _default_decoder.decode(s)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\json\decoder.py", line 365, in decode
    obj, end = self.raw_decode(s, idx=_w(s, 0).end())
TypeError: expected string or buffer
>>> 

I also tried replacing "loads" with "load", but got an error also:

>>> 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:/Users/dell/Desktop/test2.py", line 6, in <module>
    confjson = json.load(config)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\json\__init__.py", line 290, in load
    **kw)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\json\__init__.py", line 338, in loads
    return _default_decoder.decode(s)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\json\decoder.py", line 365, in decode
    obj, end = self.raw_decode(s, idx=_w(s, 0).end())
  File "C:\Python27\lib\json\decoder.py", line 383, in raw_decode
    raise ValueError("No JSON object could be decoded")
ValueError: No JSON object could be decoded
>>> 

Now, when I replaced the list with a regular string, all worked fine - so it's the list of vegetables that is causing it, however - what way could I change it so it works?

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closed as off-topic by jonrsharpe, jb., Ross Ridge, Serge Ballesta, djikay Aug 20 at 18:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – jonrsharpe, jb., Ross Ridge, Serge Ballesta, djikay
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You should certainly load, not loads - it's a file, not a string. And why don't you create a dictionary and dump it instead of trying to create your own JSON, which evidently isn't working (missing quotes)? –  jonrsharpe Aug 20 at 15:25
    
@jonrsharpe Actually, I realized the missing quotes now and fixed it. I also moved the "vegetables = vegetables.split(" ")" to be in the load part, instead of the write part. It works now. –  Snowstormer Aug 20 at 15:30
    
If you created a dict {str: list of str} you could dump the whole thing, and wouldn't need to split when you load. –  jonrsharpe Aug 20 at 15:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. You want to load from a file, which you can do with: confjson = json.load(config)
  2. Use json.dumps() to properly encode the dictionary into json with: config.write(json.dumps({'fruit': fruit, 'vegetables': vegetables}))

(The issue with your method is that the vegetables will be single-quoted, while json strings are double quoted)

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1  
Thanks, I was unsure of using json.dumps() with write. This is the answer I really needed because I realized some obvious mistakes soon after asking. –  Snowstormer Aug 20 at 15:36
    
yout could even use json.dump directly, like json.dump({... }, config). –  MartinStettner Aug 20 at 15:40

When writing, you need to enclose the values also in double quotes. You current code would write a file like

{"fruit": apple, "vegetables": tomatoes}

This is incorrect, since "apple" and "tomatoes" also need quotes.

I would suggest using the json package also for writing (using json.dumps) since this will also take care of escaping the string values (i.e. if the user enters a double quote...)

For loading, you need to use json.load instead of loads: the latter expects a string argument, the former loads the json from a file (or a file like resp. stream object)

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I already fixed the quotes. But thanks anyways. I like jh314's answer more because it explains with an example. –  Snowstormer Aug 20 at 15:35
  1. json.loads takes a string not a json file
  2. Rather than attempting to format a json file by hand, you could just write the thing as a dict and dump to file. Here's a quick take on it

    if os.path.isfile("config.json"):
         config = open('config.json', 'r')
        confjson = json.load(config)
        fruit = confjson['fruit']
        vegetables = confjson['vegetables']    
    
        print "fruit:", fruit
        print "vegetables:", vegetables
    else:
        fruit = raw_input("Enter your favourite fruit: ")
        vegetables = raw_input("Enter your favourite vegerables (separated by space): ")
        vegetables = vegetables.split(" ")
        config = open('config.json', 'w')
        res = {"fruit":fruit,"vegetables":vegetables}
        json.dump(res, config)
        config.close()
    
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