Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the real reason for that limitation? Is it just work that had to be done? Is it conceptually hard? Is it impossible?

Sure, one couldn't use the type parameters in fields, because they are allways read-write. But that can't be the answer, can it?

The reason for this question is that I'm writing an article on variance support in C# 4, and I feel that I should explain why it is restricted to delegates and interfaces. Just to inverse the onus of proof.

Update: Eric asked about an example.

What about this (don't know if that makes sense, yet :-))

public class Lookup<out T> where T : Animal {
  public T Find(string name) {
    Animal a = _cache.FindAnimalByName(name);
    return a as T;
  }
}

var findReptiles = new Lookup<Reptile>();
Lookup<Animal> findAnimals = findReptiles;

The reason for having that in one class could be the cache that is held in the class itself. And please don't name your different type pets the same!

BTW, this brings me to optional type parameters in C# 5.0 :-)

Update 2: I'm not claiming the CLR and C# should allow this. Just trying to understand what led to that it doesnt.

share|improve this question
    
Sure, that's a reasonable example but you haven't shown anything that couldn't also be done with interfaces. Just make interface ILookup<out T> and have Lookup<T> implement it. What compelling additional benefit over interface variance does your scenario for class variance add? –  Eric Lippert Mar 29 '10 at 22:47
    
None, actually. Besides that it is less code. Let me inverse the onus of proof. How could we explain why it is not supported. I'm not asking for implementing it, actually. "It has always been that way" doesn't count! :-) –  Lars Corneliussen Mar 29 '10 at 22:53
    
We don't have to provide a justification for not implementing a feature. Not implementing a feature is free. Rather, we have to provide a justification for implementing a feature -- features can cost millions of dollars to Microsoft, and impose an even larger burden upon our customers who must then spend time and money learning about the feature. –  Eric Lippert Mar 30 '10 at 16:38
1  
@Eric Lippert: I can certainly imagine a usage case for covariant structures. How about KeyValuePair<T,U>? One could define an IKeyValPair<out T, out U>, and have a struct KeyValPair<T,U> which implements it, but that would entail really horrible boxing in a lot of usage scenarios. –  supercat Aug 24 '11 at 18:21
1  
@supercat: That is an excellent example of a type that could be made covariant. The key thing here is that the data type is logically immutable, and therefore you don't have to worry about fields changing their values after you set them in the constructor. If we were to have struct or class variance, that's where I'd want to start. –  Eric Lippert Aug 24 '11 at 18:31
show 4 more comments

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

First off, as Tomas says, it is not supported in the CLR.

Second, how would that work? Suppose you have

class C<out T>
{ ... how are you planning on using T in here? ... }

T can only be used in output positions. As you note, the class cannot have any field of type T because the field could be written to. The class cannot have any methods that take a T, because those are logically writes. Suppose you had this feature -- how would you take advantage of it?

This would be useful for immutable classes if we could, say, make it legal to have a readonly field of type T; that way we'd massively cut down on the likelihood that it be improperly written to. But it's quite difficult to come up with other scenarios that permit variance in a typesafe manner.

If you have such a scenario, I'd love to see it. That would be points towards someday getting this implemented in the CLR.

UPDATE: See

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2733346/why-isnt-there-generic-variance-for-classes-in-c-4-0/2734070#2734070

for more on this question.

share|improve this answer
    
Good question :) I remember a discussion between Anders and some Java compiler geek (sorry) at the Lang.NET last year, where the Java-guy asked for this feature. He seemed to knwo why he asked. But I can't remember. I thought of classes without state. I'll try to make something up in the question. –  Lars Corneliussen Mar 29 '10 at 22:12
    
This would be definitely a nice feature for immutable data types such as Tuple<T1, T2>, but I agree that this isn't convincing enough for changing the CLR :-). –  Tomas Petricek Mar 29 '10 at 22:37
add comment

As far as I know, this feature isn't supported by CLR, so adding this would require significant work on the CLR side as well. I believe that co- and contra-variance for interfaces and delegates was actually supported on CLR before the version 4.0, so this was a relatively straightforward extension to implement.

(Supporting this feature for classes would be definitely useful, though!)

share|improve this answer
    
You're right. Variance in generic type params of interfaces and delegates came with CLR 2.0 - just not in C# –  Lars Corneliussen Mar 29 '10 at 21:49
add comment

If they were permitted, useful 100% type-safe (no internal typecasts) classes or structures could be defined which were covariant with regard to their type T, if their constructor accepted one or more T's or T supplier's. Useful, 100%-type-safe classes or structures could be defined which were contravariant with respect to T if their constructors accepted one or more T consumers. I'm not sure there's much advantage of a class over an interface, beyond the ability to use "new" rather than using a static factory method (most likely from a class whose name is similar to that of the interface), but I can certainly see usage cases for having immutable structures support covariance.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.