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Is it possible to format seq in a way that it will display the range desired but with N numbers per line?

Let say that I want seq 20 but with the following output:

1 2 3 4 5        
6 7 8 9 10        
11 12 13 14 15        
16 17 18 19 20        

My next guess would be a nested loop but I'm not sure how... Any help would be appreciated :)

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1  
seq 20 | xargs -n 5 should do the deed you need. Or if you are using bash echo {1..20} | xargs -n 5 will do. –  alvits Aug 21 at 4:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use can use awk to format it as per your needs.

$ seq 20 | awk '{ORS=NR%5?FS:RS}1'
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20

ORS is awk's built-in variable which stands for Output Record Separator and has a default value of \n. NR is awk's built-in variable which holds the line number. FS is built-in variable that stands for Field Separator and has the default value of space. RS is built-in variable that stands for Record Separator and has the default value of \n.

Our action which is a ternary operator, to check if NR%5 is true. When it NR%5 is not 0 (hence true) it uses FS as Output Record Separator. When it is false we use RS which is newline as Output Record Separator.

1 at the end triggers awk default action that is to print the line.

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1  
+1 For fast, and explanation. –  John B Aug 21 at 23:17

You can use xargs to limit the sequence displayed per line.

$ seq 20 | xargs -n 5
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20

The parameter -n 5 tells xargs to only display 5 sequence numbers.

If you have bash you can use the builtin sequence.

echo {1..20} | xargs -n 5
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Thank you for posting it. –  jaypal Aug 21 at 4:44
1  
Thanks for the encouragement to post it. –  alvits Aug 21 at 4:51
1  
+1 For simplicity. Note that for very large number sets this would be slow. –  John B Aug 21 at 23:17

Using Bash:

while read num; do 
    ((num % 5)) && printf "$line " || echo "$line"
done < <(seq 20)

Or:

for i in {1..20}; do
    s+="$i "
    if ! ((i % 5)); then
        echo $s
        s=""
    fi
done
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1  
Since you are in control of the value of i then eval won't hurt. You can say for i in {1..20..5}; do eval echo {$i..$(($i+4))}; done. The only caveat, increment is supported only on bash version 4.X. –  alvits Aug 21 at 18:10
1  
Yes, another good solution. Would be faster for large number sets. –  John B Aug 21 at 23:18

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