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So i have 2 structs:

struct cmd {
    uint8_t a;
    uint8_t b;
    uint8_t c;
}; 

typedef struct someName{
    uint8_t size;
    struct cmd cmdID;
} someName_t;

And i got a char res[0] containing the string "0xabc".

This 0xabc need to be put inside the cmd struct.

But the problem is 0xabc is 12 bit (1010 1011 1100) so if i put this into the struct with only uint8_t a and uint8_t b it will work because it will "fit" into 16 bits. But i got uint8_t a, uint8_t b and uint8_t c so 24 bits and that is my problem..

I tried:

someName_t msg;
sscanf(res[0], "0x%x", &(msg.cmdID)); 

But this does not work. This does work however if i remove the uint8_t c variable from the struct because it then fits inside the remaining 16 bits..

So how can i get the value "0xabc" into this (24bit) struct without adjusting the struct.

share|improve this question
    
Please clarify the question ... the string "0xabc" is not 16 bits. It's 5 bytes (plus terminating 0). The value 0xabc is not restricted to 16 bits either. And it seems noone understands what do you want to put in the cmd struct – fritzone Aug 21 '14 at 6:42
    
The value 0xabc = 1010 1011 1100 wich are 12 bits so if i put this into the struct with only uint8_t a and uint8_t b it will work because it will "fit" into 16 bits. But i got uint8_t a, uint8_t b and uint8_t c so 24 bits and that is my problem.. – Vinka Aug 21 '14 at 6:53
    
If something fits in 16 bits then it definitely fits in 24 too ... I still don't see the problem – fritzone Aug 21 '14 at 6:56
    
Yeah thats where you are wrong.. If i use uint8_t a and uint8_t b like i said and read it back i get 0xabc, adding the uint8_t c i get 0x2ce470 – Vinka Aug 21 '14 at 7:01
    
Now I understand ... can you update the question too? – fritzone Aug 21 '14 at 7:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you have control of your input format, i.e. you can guarantee it will always be something like 0xabc, then you can try:

const char input[] = "0xabc";
uint32_t tmp;
sscanf(input, "0x%x", &tmp);

struct cmd cmdid;
cmdid.a = (tmp & 0xFF0000U) >> 16;
cmdid.b = (tmp & 0xFF00U) >> 8;
cmdid.c = (tmp & 0xFFU);
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like what i need!. It will indeed always be 0x..., the only problem is that i dont want to go "inside" the cmd struct. But seems like i have no other option.. – Vinka Aug 21 '14 at 8:38

You could try changing struct cmd to:

struct cmd {
    unsigned int c:4;
    unsigned int b:4;
    unsigned int a:4;
};

But YMMV depending on compiler. Works OK on MSVC++ 2010.

share|improve this answer
    
But the OP specified "without adjusting the struct"... – Coconop Aug 21 '14 at 9:08
    
True and the issue is related to 24 bits because this works also: uint16_t a:8; uint16_t b:8; uint16_t c:8; – Vinka Aug 21 '14 at 9:41

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