Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to utilize the UnitTest++ library in a testing file. However, I am having some difficulty getting the library to be included at compile time. So here is my current directory structure:

tests/
  UnitTests++/
    libUnitTest++.a
    src/
      UnitTests++.h
  unit/
    test.cpp

I have just used the UnitTest++ getting started guide to just get the library setup. Here is test.cpp:

// test.cpp
#include <UnitTest++.h>

TEST(FailSpectacularly)
{
 CHECK(false);
}

int main()
{
 return UnitTest::RunAllTests();
}

And I am currently trying to compile with:

gcc -lUnitTest++ -L../UnitTest++/ -I../UnitTest++/src/ test.cpp

I am currently getting a bunch output with ld: symbol(s) not found at the end. So how would I be able to get the UnitTest++ library properly included when this program is compiled? I am on a Mac and I'd also like for there to be an easy way for people on a Linux machine to run these same tests.

Whew, I hope this provides enough information, if not please let me know.

share|improve this question
    
Please post your Makefile and the actual errors from ld. I think you are missing -lUnitTest++ at the end of your current command and that's it –  Sam Post Mar 30 '10 at 3:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was able to build it in the following manner

gcc -L../UnitTest++/ -I../UnitTest++/src/ test.cpp -lUnitTest++ -lstdc++

or

g++ -L../UnitTest++/ -I../UnitTest++/src/ test.cpp -lUnitTest++

that links to libstdc++ automatically.


GCC documentation says:

-llibrary

-l library

Search the library named library when linking. (The second alternative with the library as a separate argument is only for POSIX compliance and is not recommended.)

It makes a difference where in the command you write this option; the linker searches and processes libraries and object files in the order they are specified.

Thus, foo.o -lz bar.o' searches libraryz' after file foo.o but before bar.o. If bar.o refers to functions in `z', those functions may not be loaded.

I guess that's why the library symbols are not found when you first specify -lUnitTest++ and then test.cpp

share|improve this answer

Compile test.cpp to get test.o

and use

g++ test.o libUnitTest++.a -o ./exectest

to get the ./exectest executable

libUnitTest++.a is just an archive of all the object files of UnitTest++. You just need to link all the object files (your test object file + libUnitTest++.a)

Try editing the makefile that came with unittest++ and make it suitable for your case

share|improve this answer

The message ld: symbol(s) not found means you haven't compiled the library. So you need to go in the UnitTest++ folder, compile and install it.

I've never worked on a MAC, but in linux, libraries are usually compiled and installed with:

./configure
make
make install

In the UnitTest++ link you posted, you should simply:

make install

Then you will have the UnitTest++.so library in the libraries folder of your OS. Now the library can be linked with your program with the -lUnitTest++ command.

share|improve this answer

Usually you have to put -Lsomething before the -lsomething that requires it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.