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Goal

I'm trying to create a series of promise 'enhancers' which will add functionality (such as caching, queuing, redirect handling, etc.) around existing promises which are simple http requests.

Problem

The issue I'm experiencing with this method of enhancing promises is that if an enhancement adds any functions or publicly accessible properties to the promise (or if I'm wrapping an already-enhanced promise like a restangular request), those are lost when I wrap it in a new promise by returning a new $q.

Question

What pattern can I use to enhance or wrap promises (like in the two examples below), but without losing any other (non-conflicting) enhancements promises might have?

Example 1

Here is an example that will automatically handle 503-Retry-After errors:

function _enhancePromiseWithAutoRetry(promise) {
  var enhancedPromise = $q(function(resolve, reject) {
    var newReject = get503Handler(this, resolve, reject);
    promise.then(resolve, newReject);
  });

  // 503 handling isn't enabled until the user calls this function.
  enhancedPromise.withAutoRetry = function(onRetry, timeout) {
    var newPromise = angular.copy(this);
    newPromise._503handled = true;
    newPromise._503onRetry = onRetry;
    newPromise._503timeout = timeout;
    return newPromise;
  };

  return enhancedPromise;
}

The idea is that if I return a promise enhanced with the above function, the user can go:

someRequest.withAutoRetry().then(onSuccess, onError);

Or to be more clear (with chaining):

someRequest.then(onSuccess, onAnyError)
           .withAutoRetry().then(onSuccess, onNon503Error);

Here, the first call to then(...) might error out right away if the server is busy, but the calls after .withAutoRetry() will poll the server with repeated requests until the response is successful, or a non RetryAfter error is returned.

Example 2

Here is an another example which adds custom caching behaviour:

function _enhancePromiseWithCache(promise, cacheGet, cachePut) {
  // Wrap the old promise with a new one that will get called first.
  return $q(function(resolve, reject) {
    // Check if the value is cached using the provided function
    var cachedResponse = cacheGet !== undefined ? cacheGet() : undefined;
    if(cachedResponse !== undefined){
      resolve(cachedResponse);
    } else {
      // Evaluate the wrapped promise, cache the result, then return it.
      promise.then(cachePut);
      promise.then(resolve, reject);
    }
  });
}

This one allows the library to set up a cache of data which can be used instead of making requests to the server, and can be added to after a request is completed. For example:

lib.getNameOrigin = function(args) {
  var restRequest = Restangular.all('people').one(args.id).get('nameOrigin');
  // Cache, since all people with the same name will have the same name origin
  var enhancedPromise = _enhancePromiseWithCache(restRequest,
                          function(){ return nameOrigins[args.name]; },
                          function(val){ nameOrigins[args.name] = val; });
  return enhancedPromise;
}

Elsewhere

// Will transparently populate the cache
lib.getNameOrigin({id: 123, name:'john'}).then(onSuccess, onError).then(...);

And somewhere else entirely

// Will transparently retrieve the result from the cache rather than make request
lib.getNameOrigin({id: 928, name:'john'}).then(onSuccess, onError);

Possible Solution

I've considered copying the original promise, but then overwriting the new one's then function with an implementation that references the original promise's then (using the Proxy Pattern), but is this safe? I know there's a lot more to promises than just the then function.

share|improve this question
    
This changes between Angular 1.2 and Angular 1.3, is that relevant for you? Which would you like me to focus on? In either case you have to override the then, it is safe as long as your .then is Promises/A+ complaint – Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 21 '14 at 15:03
    
Also, I'm not sure I understand your use case $http(...).cache().then(... makes sense but $http(...).then(function(){ return 3}).cache() doesn't make sense, is 3 cached? Where? To what point? It actually does make sense that those methods only affect the other side. Can you be more specific about what you're adding? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 21 '14 at 15:04
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum the most recent version of angular is fine. What about the .catch() method? Does that have to be overridden too or is it guaranteed to simply call .then(undefined, reject)? – Alain Aug 21 '14 at 15:08
    
Guaranteed? No, but in practice it does. It is only guaranteed to have the same effect. Although - I think what I wrote about chaining being problematic to begin with is significant. What does caching or queueing mean after it was chained? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 21 '14 at 15:09
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum the second use case is for a library to return enhancePromiseWithCache($http(...), cache.makeGetterFor(args), cache.makePutterFor(args)). The user would return the consume the promise normally: someRequest.then(onSuccess, onFailure).then(somethingElse);, only the $http request/response gets intercepted. – Alain Aug 21 '14 at 15:11
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The solution is not to enhance the promises themselves, but the factories that create them.

Use functional programming and/or aspect-orientated programming approaches to decorate the original function. This will not only be less errorprone, but more concise, composable and reusable.

function decorate(makeThenable) {
    return function(...args) {
        … // before creating the thenable
        return makeThenable(...args).then(function(value) {
            … // handle fulfillment
            return …; // the resulting value
        }, function(error) {
            … // handle rejection
            return …; // (or throw)
        });
    };
}
var decorated = decorate(myThenablemaker);
decorated(…).then(whenFulfilled, whenRejected);

Example 1:

function withAutoRetry(request, timeout) {
    return function() {
        var args = arguments;
        return request.apply(null, args).catch(function handle(e) {
            if (e instanceof Http503Error) // or whatever
                return request.apply(null, args).catch(handle);
            else
                throw e;
        });
    };
}

withAutoRetry(someRequest)().then(onSuccess, onError);

withAutoRetry(function() {
    return someRequest().then(onSuccess, onAnyError);
})().then(onSuccess, onNon503Error);

Example 2:

function withCache(request, hash) {
    var cache = {};
    if (!hash) hash = String;
    return function() {
        var key = hash.apply(this, arguments);
        if (key in cache)
            return cache[key];
        else
            return cache[key] = request.apply(this, arguments);
    };
}

lib.getNameOrigin = withCache(function(args) {
    return Restangular.all('people').one(args.id).get('nameOrigin');
}, function(args) {
    return args.name;
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'm finding it hard to separate your implementation of specific features (caching / 503 handling) from your general approach here. From what I can guess, your approach mainly has to do with the use of apply. Could you perhaps elaborate or add an example that involves wrapping any arbitrary thennable with arbitrary actions that takes place: 1. before resolve, 2. after resolve, 3. before reject, 4. after reject? – Alain Aug 21 '14 at 20:45
    
From your Example 2, it looks like calling lib.getNameOrigin({id: 123, name:'john'}).then(onSuccess, onError) will result in an TypeError: .then is not a function error if 'john' is in cache, because in that case it returns the cached result object directly instead of a thennable. Am I misunderstanding your implementation? – Alain Aug 21 '14 at 21:01
    
+1, this is similar to what we ended up doing after all the debate about using in Bluebird. Decorating a whole chain is definitely a way to do this. This is still not how I'd cache but definitely a better approach than overriding .then. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 21 '14 at 21:24
    
@Alain: The cache contains the promises, not the values. Which has the additional benefit that a second call during a ongoing request returns the same promise as the first call, instead of starting a second request. – Bergi Aug 22 '14 at 10:56
    
@Alain: I've tried to make add a general example now. I wasn't sure what you meant by "before"/"after" resolution of which thenable - you usually don't know when it's "before". Notice that the handleX arbitrary functions are not "actions", but normal then handlers that need to return a value for chaining. – Bergi Aug 22 '14 at 11:15

Here's the solution I proposed in my Possible Solution section, so that it can be discussed in detail.

I've considered copying the original promise, but then overwriting the new one's then function with an implementation that resolves the original promise, but is this safe?

New Example

function _enhancePromiseWithQueuing(promise, id) {
  // Copy the old promise and overwrite its then method.
  var enhancedPromise = angular.copy(promise);
  enhancedPromise.then = function(resolve, reject) {
    // Resolves the original promise once the existing `id` queue is clear.
    queue.enqueueRequest(id, function() { promise.then(resolve, reject); });
    return this;
  };
  return enhancedPromise;
}

Example 1 (from above)

function _enhancePromiseWithAutoRetry(promise) {    
  // Copy the old promise and enhance it with the withAutoRetry method.
  var enhancedPromise = angular.copy(promise);
  // Add a function that enables 503 Retry-After handling when called.
  enhancedPromise.withAutoRetry = function(onRetry, timeout) {
    // Copy the old promise and overwrite its then method.
    var promiseWith503Handling = angular.copy(this);
    promiseWith503Handling.then = function(resolve, reject) {
      // Call the original promise then method with a modified reject handler.
      return this.then(resolve, get503Handler(this, resolve, reject,
                                              onRetry, timeout, new Date()));
    };
    return promiseWith503Handling;
  };    
  return enhancedPromise;
}

Example 2 (from above)

function _enhancePromiseWithCache(promise, cacheGet, cachePut) {
  var enhancedPromise = angular.copy(promise);
  enhancedPromise.then = function(resolve, reject) {
    // Check if the value is cached using the provided function
    var cachedResponse = cacheGet !== undefined ? cacheGet() : undefined;
    if(cachedResponse !== undefined){
      return resolve(cachedResponse);
    } else {
      // Resolve the original promise, cache the result, then return it.
      promise.then(cachePut);
      return promise.then(resolve, reject);
    }
  };
  return enhancedPromise;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Overwriting then can be safe, but requires a lot of attention (it's errorprone), and probably destroys most of the optimisations that the promise library put there; as well as some other library-dependent features. – Bergi Aug 21 '14 at 18:47
    
@Bergi I thought it would be dangerous, but I couldn't find any examples of where it might cause problems. Providing no errors are made, what features or optimizations might it destroy? – Alain Aug 21 '14 at 21:10
1  
An error I can spot in your implementations is that the new then doesn't return anything. Features like progress messaging or cancellation (whatever the promise library supports) would need to be integrated in the solution, and make it very implementation-dependent (in contrast to my approach, which does not require modification when the promise lib is swapped). The optimisations are implementation-dependent as well, many libraries use smaller primitives than the then method of the involved promises to implement their then method. – Bergi Aug 22 '14 at 11:07
    
You're right, I missed adding in return statements after switching over from the $q constructor. – Alain Aug 22 '14 at 15:17

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