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Why you can do this in C#?

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Test test = new Test();            
    }
}
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1  
why would you not be able to do it? –  fearofawhackplanet Mar 30 '10 at 8:29
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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can create new instances of any non abstract, non static class including your own where ever you can write code ...

Test is not a static class, even if it does not have any non-static methods. It always gets a default constructor if there isn't defined any. So you can call it.

class Foo
{
}

static class Bar
{
   static void Baz()
   {
     // you can create an instance of class Foo
     Foo f = new Foo();
   }
}
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Why wouldn't you be able to? Main() is a static method. (Edit: And anyway, you can create new instances of non-abstract, non-static classes almost anywhere. See Stefan Steinegger's comment and answer.)

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You can create a new Tests even in non-static methods. –  Stefan Steinegger Mar 30 '10 at 8:32
    
You are right, of course. Upvoted your answer and adjusted mine accordingly. –  MatthewKing Mar 30 '10 at 8:41
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Why would you do this?

A well-designed object-oriented program is a graph of objects and sub-objects. However, entry points to programs are typically very procedural. Creating an instance of a root object (which then creates sub-objects, etc.) is a good way to bootstrap your object graph.

This is why you see things like Application.Run(new MyClass()); in static main methods.

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A real-world application of this behaviour is the Singleton Pattern. Now that you know about it - don't use it ;)

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Why not? I just tried it and it works

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You can do this, because Main is static. It runs without any instance whatsovever. So, elsewhere in the code you could call Test.Main directly without having to create an instance of it.

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You can create a new Tests even in non-static methods. –  Stefan Steinegger Mar 30 '10 at 8:32
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