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I am trying to create an interface to an array in C++.


In the code below
tmpClass[1].GetA() returns 'w'
tmpInterface[1] causes an error.

Is there any way to define an interface so it can access the elements of the array?
How to I get tmpInterface to behave like tmpClass?

struct IA
{
    virtual char GetA() = 0;
    virtual void SetA(char pA) = 0;
};

class A:public IA
{
    public:
        A(){ var = 0; }
        A(char pVar){ var = pVar; }
        char GetA(){ return var; }
        void SetA(char pA){ var = pA; }
    private:
    int var;
};

class B
{
    public:
        B(){ 
            mA[0].SetA('c');
            mA[1].SetA('w');
            mA[2].SetA('6');
            mA[3].SetA('$');
        }

        int GetCount(){}
        IA* Get1(){ return mA; }
        A* Get2(){ return mA; }
    protected:
        A mA[4];
};


int main()
{
    B mainClass;
    IA *tmpInterface = mainClass.Get1();
    A *tmpClass = mainClass.Get2();

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        //once i>0 then tmpInterface no longer points to a valid character
        //and program crashes
        System::Console::Write(
            "A = "+tmpClass[i].GetA()+
            " IA = "+tmpInterface[i].GetA()); 
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The subscript operator uses pointer arithmetic, and performing pointer arithmetic on a pointer whose type is different from the actual type of the object it points to is undefined behavior. §5.7 [expr.add]/p7:

For addition or subtraction, if the expressions P or Q have type “pointer to cv T”, where T is different from the cv-unqualified array element type, the behavior is undefined. [ Note: In particular, a pointer to a base class cannot be used for pointer arithmetic when the array contains objects of a derived class type. —end note ]

So, to index into an array of As, you need an A*. If you want to use IA only, then you'd need to apply some programmer's panacea - indirection. Return an IA ** pointing to the first element of an array of IA *, whose members each point to an A.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no way to create an interface to an array in c++ that will allow me to access its elements; unless I do the pointer math myself? – user3140515 Aug 22 '14 at 1:55

Note that polymorphism only works with pointers or references to instances of a class, not with the instances directly. This is at the root of your problem.

You might consider using std::vector<A*> instead of an array.

share|improve this answer

In an object of type B, you have an array of A objects. You return a pointer to the first element of the array in both the member functions B::Get1() and B::Get2().

Let's say the lay out the array is:

+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
|    mA[0]     |    mA[1]     |    mA[2]     |    mA[3]     |         
+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+

When you execute

IA *tmpInterface = mainClass.Get1();
A *tmpClass = mainClass.Get2();

You have tempInterface and tmpClass pointing to the first element of mA.

+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
|    mA[0]     |    mA[1]     |    mA[2]     |    mA[3]     |         
+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
^
| 
tmpInterface as well as tmpClass

When you do arithmetic operations on tmpInterface and tmpClass, you will see very different results.

Where do tmpInterface+1 and tmpClass+1 point?

+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
|    mA[0]     |    mA[1]     |    mA[2]     |    mA[3]     |         
+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
      ^        ^
      |        | 
      |        tmpClass+1
      tmpInterface+1

Since tmpClass is of type A*, tmpClass+1 points to the next object in the array. However, since the type of tmpInterface is IA*, and sizeof(IA) is not the same as sizeof(A), tmpInterface+1 points to something in the middle. It does not point to an object of type IA. If you try to access tmpInterface+1 as a IA*, you are going to get undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer

In effective C++,it says don't use polymorphism on array; You can add a virtual function behave like operator [],eg:

struct IA
{
    //...
    virtual IA* Offset(int index)
    {
        return this + index;
    }
};

class A:public IA
{
public:
    //...
    virtual A* Offset(int index)
    {
        return this + index;
    }
};

then it works fine.

cout << "A = " << tmpClass->Offset(i)->GetA();
cout << " IA = " << tmpInterface->Offset(i)->GetA() << endl;

Besides,what is System::Console::Write in C++?

share|improve this answer
    
System::Console::Write The visual studio wizard dropped that in when I created the C++ Console project. – user3140515 Aug 22 '14 at 2:16

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