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I am converting a website from ISO to UTF-8, so I need to convert the MySQL database too.

On the Internet, I read various solutions, I don't know wich one to choose.

Do I really need to convert my varchar columns to binary, then to UTF-8 like that:

ALTER TABLE t MODIFY col BINARY(150);
ALTER TABLE t MODIFY col CHAR(150) CHARACTER SET utf8;

It takes a long time to do that for each column, of each table, of each database.

I have 10 databases, with 20 tables each, wich around 2 - 3 varchar colums (2 queries each column), this gives me around 1000 queries to write! How come? How to do?

Resolved : I post the code that I have used:

PASSWORD=""
db=$1

mysqldump --password=$PASSWORD --set-charset --skip-set-charset --add-drop-table --databases "$db" > /home/dev/backup/bdd.sql

QUERY="ALTER DATABASE \`$db\` DEFAULT CHARACTER SET utf8;"
mysql --password=$PASSWORD --database "$db" -e "$QUERY"

mysql --password=$PASSWORD --default-character-set=utf8 < /home/dev/backup/bdd.sql

See answer below for more information.

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1  
Aren't --set-charset and --skip-set-charset directly competing flags? Docs say they affect the use of SET NAMES, but doesn't set the DEFAULT CHARSET=X parameter that is output via mysqldump per table. (mysql 5.5) –  fideloper Jan 28 at 21:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can do that very easily using a dump. Make a dump using

mysqldump --skip-opt --set-charset --skip-set-charset 

Then create another database, set its default character set to UTF-8 and then load your dump back with:

mysql --default-character-set=<your iso encoding>

The main idea is to make a dump without any sign of data encoding.
So, at create time, the table's encoding would be inherit from the database encoding and set to UTF-8. And with --default-character-set we tell MySQL to recode our data automatically.

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Oh this seems nice ! Why isn't that on the documentation, or nobody talks about that anywhere, thanks I will test it –  Matthieu Napoli Mar 30 '10 at 9:31
    
@Matthieu as it seems you're going to make it with --all-databases, please make it with precautions. Make a backup and test whole algorithm on one database first. –  Your Common Sense Mar 30 '10 at 9:50
    
Well I just tested (on one database only, to be sure) and this doesn't change the encoding of the columns (they are still in "latin"). Just to be sure, for the mysqldump, the 3 parameters don't need values ? –  Matthieu Napoli Mar 30 '10 at 9:56
    
@Matthieu this is actually 2 parameters, as far as I understand. --skip-opt --set-charset tell database not to add default charset clause to the table definitions. And --skip-set-charset remove SET NAMES query from the top of the dump. How do you know of data encoding? utf-8 is very similar to latin1 What does it say of table encoding if you run SHOW CREATE TABLE tablename for the new table? is there any character sets in the dump? Do you name utf8 properly (as it differ from usual utf-8) –  Your Common Sense Mar 30 '10 at 11:05
1  
Doesn't work at all for me on 5.5 –  dan-klasson Feb 14 '13 at 18:14

I'm using mysqldump Ver 10.11 Distrib 5.0.77

For some reason create options Engine and auto_increment was omitted. This caused a lot of insert errors, because auto_increment was gone on primary key fields.

This worked for me. I'm using --opt and using sed to remove charset from sql file.

mysqldump -p --opt --skip-set-charset --add-drop-table dbname > /tmp/dbname.sql
sed -i 's/DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1//g' /tmp/dbname.sql 
ALTER DATABASE dbname DEFAULT CHARACTER SET utf8 DEFAULT COLLATE utf8_danish_ci;
mysql -p --default-character-set=utf8 db < /tmp/dbname.sql 
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As Mysql 5.5 will output DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1, which the --default-character-set=utf8 won't overwrite on import, this step becomes necessary. I used sed -i 's/DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1/DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8/g' /tmp/dbname.sql to explicitly set it to utf8. –  fideloper Jan 28 at 21:25
mysqldump --opt --skip-set-charset --default-character-set='latin1' -u root -p revive_adserver --result-file='dump.sql'

vim dump.sql

:%s/latin1/utf8/gi

:wq

mysql -u root -p

ALTER DATABASE revive_adserver CHARACTER SET utf8;

\q

mysql -D revive_adserver -u root -p < dump.sql
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