Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is what it looks like on my laptop with less than 4G:

0x004012f1 <main+0>:    push   %ebp
0x004012f2 <main+1>:    mov    %esp,%ebp
0x004012f4 <main+3>:    sub    $0x18,%esp
0x004012f7 <main+6>:    and    $0xfffffff0,%esp

Can someone using RAM larger than 4G paste a dump?

I think it should be no longer like 0x004012f7 as its capacity is only 2^32=4G

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Here's a sample from my 64bit OS, the addresses are just twice as long like you'd expect...twice the address length to address 2^2*n bytes:

000000007729EE15  ldmxcsr     dword ptr [rcx+34h]  
000000007729EE19  fldcw       word ptr [rcx+100h]  
000000007729EE1F  mov         rsp,qword ptr [rcx+98h]  
000000007729EE26  mov         rcx,qword ptr [rcx+0F8h]  
share|improve this answer
    
BTW,isn't there a 0x prefix on 64bit OS? –  Mask Mar 30 '10 at 10:43
    
@Mask - Just a matter of how different debuggers show it in output is all, the address is after the x. –  Nick Craver Mar 30 '10 at 10:58

On a 32bit OS, the addressable space will indeed only be 2^32 = 4Gb.

On a 64bit OS (assuming a 64bit application), it will be 2^64, which is much much larger.

share|improve this answer
    
I just corrected 2^32 should be 4G,so on a 32bit os,RAM larger than 4G is just a waste,right? –  Mask Mar 30 '10 at 10:26
    
@Mask - usually, but not necessarily, there are physical address extensions available as well. –  Nick Craver Mar 30 '10 at 10:27
    
@Oded,can 64bit application be run on 32bit OS? –  Mask Mar 30 '10 at 10:29
    
@Nick Craver,how will the disassemble look like then? –  Mask Mar 30 '10 at 10:30
    
@Mask - Posted a sample since you're curious :) –  Nick Craver Mar 30 '10 at 10:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.